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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have Advanced YST Subwoofer system YST-SW205, a Yamaha AV reciever RX-V2400, and 2 KEF Model 103/3 Reference Series Type SP 3078. All was given to me by a widow. What would be the proper distance to place monitors from reciever? My computer room is 15 by 15.
 

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Create an equilateral triangle between you and the speakers. Then move them closer together till the soundstage sounds good to you. If your desk doesn't allow that move them as far apart as you can and start from there.

Stereo sound is a relationship between your location and the speakers'.
 

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Thank you for the info. Will transpose the info as they aren't on desk. Speakers are 3 1/2 feet tall and weigh 45 pounds apiece.This is my first quality equipment as have never had spare money but always wanted equipment that made it seem like you were at the concert.
 

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Got another problem... I have KEF 4 Omh speakers... when I tried to set Yamaha reciever output only had 6 or 8 omh choices... should I get an 8 omh bridge? Do not know anything about this stuff..
 

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For short period time your 4ohm load shouldn't be a problem. Especially if you're leveraging the sub to do most of the heavy lifting. Set the Yamaha for 6ohm and just make sure it doesn't get over say ~100°F.

Your nominal impedance of 4ohm means that the speaker's impedance averages out to about 4ohm across whatever frequency range they were measured. Your Yamaha says it can handle the draw from as low as 6ohm for a sustained period of time.

Here's the thing about impedance:
1) It's variable. Depending on frequency, volume, and component temperature your impedance will shift +\- 1-2ohm.
2) speaker ratings are just a WAG from speaker manufacturers. They can be close but really you never know.
3) impedance matching can have a huge impact on volume and fullness of sound. This is just my opinion but I think it's worth mentioning.
4) you usually won't break anything with an 8 vs 4ohm mismatch in a single room application.
5) you can jack things up greatly when you have an impedance mismatch with multi zone audio.

I'll leave it to another forum member to explain the physics electromechanical of impedance because I'll do a very poor job of trying. Needless to say that as resistance goes down the equipment tries to force more current down the line and as a result of working harder creates more heat.

Hope that helps.
 

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Got another problem... I have KEF 4 Omh speakers... when I tried to set Yamaha reciever output only had 6 or 8 omh choices... should I get an 8 omh bridge? Do not know anything about this stuff..

The lower impedance can cause the speakers to draw more current at higher volumes, causing overheating, so even with the 6Ω setting, don't crank the AVR to maximum. An audiophile/installer on another forum claims that the impedance switch in Yamaha amps are worthless, but I recommend doing it anyway.

As an anecdote, I have allegedly 4Ω speakers from Bose (very old), a Bose engineer told me they were effectively 6Ω, and I've used them on a series of Yamaha amps for years without incident. Prior to that I had Sony AVRs, that started exhibiting problems, until the Bose engineer told me they had a lot of problem reports of Sony AVRs, allegedly due to cheaper chipset materials in their products.

Addendum

I read posts on Audioholics and elsewhere about these impedance switches, it's partly just to pass UL ratings, being able to step down power use in the amp with lower impedance speakers and not heat up egregiously. Equal parts safety measure and marketing (manufacturer can say they support 4Ω speakers without the heavy heat sinks that really would require). I still suggest using the switch if you're uninterested in the precautions.
 
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