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How do I calibrate SB-12 without sound meters?

I will be getting my sun SB-12 in three days and have no idea how to calibrate it with my system.

My system is a a average lounge (small-medium size 32sq) with
Marantz PM550 DC amp (old amp) without sub RCA output - only EQ or SPK out put to the sub.
KEF Corellie speakers.

What should I do first?

What happens to the sub adjustments when I want to listen to my music in different sound levels from my amp's volume control?

Do I have to keep changing my sub adjustment to suit my amp's volume settings?
 

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SVS has really good manuals. I would follow their instructions, they also have nice directions on their website. Once you set the sub up and callibrate it, you won't need to worry about it as you increase and decrease your volume. In theory, you could increase your sub levels when you listen at really quiet volume levels and decrease it when you listen loudly. The reason for this, is bass is harder to hear at lower volumes, but most people just set it and forget it. I would really recommend getting a spl meter. you can do it by ear, but it is really tough. If you don't have a spl meter, I would listen to some bass heavy music that you are familiar with and set it to the point that it blends with you mains. Usually start with a lower volume, and increase the sub level to the point where you can notice it as a seperate speaker, and decrease it slightly until it blends.
 

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More or less what you do is just listen to it. Assuming you don't have any test tone CDs either, or easy way to hook your computer in, then the best thing to do is probably listen to some good bassy music. Listen on just speakers a bit, then put the sub in and listen and adjust. Then take the sub out, listen on speakers again, then the sub back in and adjust and so on.

The idea is to get it so that when the sub is in, you get lower bass extension, but not any louder bass. You want it to smoothly slide from speakers to sub.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
SVS has really good manuals. I would follow their instructions, they also have nice directions on their website. Once you set the sub up and callibrate it, you won't need to worry about it as you increase and decrease your volume. In theory, you could increase your sub levels when you listen at really quiet volume levels and decrease it when you listen loudly. The reason for this, is bass is harder to hear at lower volumes, but most people just set it and forget it. I would really recommend getting a spl meter. you can do it by ear, but it is really tough. If you don't have a spl meter, I would listen to some bass heavy music that you are familiar with and set it to the point that it blends with you mains. Usually start with a lower volume, and increase the sub level to the point where you can notice it as a seperate speaker, and decrease it slightly until it blends.
I have an option of buying analog or digital sound meter. Which would be more suitable to balance and follow SVS sub woofer setup using its manual?
 

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I have an option of buying analog or digital sound meter. Which would be more suitable to balance and follow SVS sub woofer setup using its manual?
Either will work, but get the analog. When you calibrate your subwoofer, the value will fluctuate by a coubple of dBs. It is just easier to read the analog one.
 

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Either will work, but get the analog. When you calibrate your subwoofer, the value will fluctuate by a coubple of dBs. It is just easier to read the analog one.
It really makes no difference however the digital ones will be more accurate and can be set to "slow" so the display wont change fast. The Galaxy CM140 is by far the best meter for around $100 and works really well with REW.
 

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I'll second the recommendation of the CM-140. Easy to use and seems reliable. What I mean by that is that even if fast mode, it gives a steady reading if sound pressure is steady. Too many things I've seen fluctuate a lot, making them hard to use. This one is rock steady, if the sound is, but responds if it changes.

Also it has a min-max mode which you could use if it is a variable tone you are looking at. Check the max you hit and calibrate off of that.
 
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