Home Theater Forum and Systems banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
When hiding Cables through wall for HDTV wall mounts, can anyone advise me how to address fireblocks? I usually use a stud finder first to determine if the wall has the horizontal firebreaks between studs and will not hide cables through wall if there are, but if there is a way around this I am certainly ready to learn.

thanks
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
When hiding Cables through wall for HDTV wall mounts, can anyone advise me how to address fireblocks? I usually use a stud finder first to determine if the wall has the horizontal firebreaks between studs and will not hide cables through wall if there are, but if there is a way around this I am certainly ready to learn.

thanks
Mike
im running into the same problem. i was thinking extension bits. sometime the allen screw on the extensions come loose so be carefull. have a telescoping magnet handy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
These are tough, and typically you have to cut a hole in the drywall out above or below the block so you can drill through it. Then patch the hole back up when your done fishing. I've seen for thinner wires, drilling a hole above and below the block and channeling a grove in the drywall between the holes. Spackle over the wire and holes...

If this is something you do regularly I would invest in some long flex bits. Greenlee makes some that are available at your local Lowes or Home Depot. Just look in the electrical tools section.

Remember these are typically there for code and modifying them could hold you liable. Although I doubt anything would occur, I would suggest using in-wall rated wiring and fireproof sealant around any holes drilled.
 
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
hey

what i usualy like to do with fire blocks is first, i find the exact location of the block. usualy this is a combination of studfinder / small screwdriver. after you locate it by stud finder, use one of those micro screwdrivers and poke a few holes in the suspect area to confirm its location, i usualy poke about 2 holes above and below to make sure its a standard 2x4 block (sometimes they use more than 1)

next i get a 2-1/4 inch hole saw and make a hole to the required depth to run the cableing. remoeing the peices of block is usualy the hard part, just take your time and be carfull not to do too much damage to the sheetrock.... and you did rember to save the sheetrock doenut right? this will make patching the hole much more easy. (expecialy if the wall in question is textured)

you also have a second option here, you can also use a standard blank plate to cover the hole if you dont feel the need to patch the rock, so if this is your choice, you may discard said doenut.

and just some friendly side notes:

dont forget the power for your tv, if it is not long enough you can buy a longer one at your local computer shop (or online retailer of choice) or.... simply get an extention cord and extend the one you have. (its advisable to tape them 2gether) now you can plug your tv into a surge protector/ power conditioner :T
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
I was also thinking on the side speakers and front i will do some sort of wood work. mabey a built out column.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
137 Posts
Remember these are typically there for code and modifying them could hold you liable. Although I doubt anything would occur, I would suggest using in-wall rated wiring and fireproof sealant around any holes drilled.
I was just about to post something along those same lines Bill.

If in fact it is blocking that is a requirement to satisfy code then fire rated caulk is the product that should be used for caulking. Yes fire rated caulking is more expensive. The blocking is there to impede fire from jumping directly into another cavity that can allow the fire to continue to spread uninhibited. The FR caulk matches the requirements to keep you, not only compliant, but at ease that you did the right thing to safeguard your investment.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top