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How long should a new TV last?

  • I expect 10-12 years of near trouble free service

    Votes: 32 86.5%
  • After 5 years I got my money's worth

    Votes: 4 10.8%
  • It survived the manufacturers waranty, what more could I expect

    Votes: 1 2.7%
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Discussion Starter #1
You just spent $3200.00 on a new HDTV, curious as to what you all expect from your new HDTV's?
 

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Actually, I would be happy with the 10+ year life span with parts available at reasonable prices, not necessarily 100% trouble free. Having to service a set once or twice in its life is not unreasonable, IMO, as long as the failures are not catastrophic, nor so prevalent as to suggest a design flaw or the use of inferior parts.
 

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Given what a person pays for a display one should expect about 10 years out of it. CRT displays from the early 90's are still going strong in most cases so should the newer flat panel displays.
 

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Read somewhere that <costly> bandwidth increases will take 8+ yrs to occur, likely more and most signals will be 1080i until then, so the current state will like be much the same for the time being, with slight changes in technology such as 120 hz for lcd's.

I just bought a 720 vs the 1080 and at 14', can't see any difference in resolution, BUT picture quality could be a bit better, especially with upconverting- old media is still old and 1080 capability doesn't necessarily make a difference:rubeyes:

I'm hope for 10-12 good years of use, but agree with lcaillo's opinion.
 

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10 years would be nice, but previous to my new 1080p Samsung I was always upgrading every 5 years or so as resolutions increased. Now that we're at 1080p, I wonder if it will go higher yet.

1440P is on the horizon .... I've already seen it at our industry conventions (Cedia). A few issues they need to work out first (like HDMI can't handle it yet) before it arrives on the consumer market.
They were shooting for a mid 2011 release of the resolution standard.
 

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The way that a lot of tv's are so cheaply made now a lot of failures are occurring very early. My thoughts on this is that the Manufacturers would rather see prices of $1000 or less and have someone have to replace every couple years. A lot of them probably don't mind their products going south so early, because they know no one is going back to a smaller tv.

I imagine I will have my CRT RPTV for years to come. They're still easy to have services also.
 

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1440P is on the horizon .... I've already seen it at our industry conventions (Cedia). A few issues they need to work out first (like HDMI can't handle it yet) before it arrives on the consumer market.
They were shooting for a mid 2011 release of the resolution standard.
Yes this is true but networks as well as Sony have already stated that they will not adopt this new format as it will require too much cost and will require more upgrading There simply is no need to go higher than 1080p.
 

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A TV should easily last 10 years. My parents' "backup" TV is an ancient thing with a "clicky" remote! Still works great, just a little too small.
 

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Yes this is true but networks as well as Sony have already stated that they will not adopt this new format as it will require too much cost and will require more upgrading There simply is no need to go higher than 1080p.
There is much to do to get the execution of the current standards improved. For most consumer applications, the existing standards can be extremely good, but much of what we see is not even close to potential. The difference between a calibrated and OOB set is far greater than the benefit of 1440p. If they just made all displays capable of being calibrated completely and properly, we would have much better images than if we all had 1440p with the current limitations in many sets. Then there is the production and distribution chain...
 

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There are good reasons that a "small" TV can last far longer than a larger one. The beam current and complexity required to produce a larger image makes for inherently shorter life of many components, or requires a lot more investment in quality parts. Since prices of televisions have dropped severely over the years, as the screen size has increased, it does not take a very bright person to see that there have to be some trade offs.
 

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This thread got me thinking as to how many hours have I put on my projector in my theater room. I went ahead and checked it last night, and I am already at 1,907 hours! Most projectors need the bulb replaced after 2,000 hours! My Mitsubishi is suppose to last 5,000 hours. Looks like my bulb is only going to last 2 to 2 1/2 years in my house. Hopefully the projector will last much longer than that!
 

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My Mitsubishi 55907 made it 7 years before a problem. It lost the convergence amp. This turned out to be a cold solder joint between the leads to circuit board. A few hours of careful work to remove the main board and a re-solder of the multi pin IC did the trick. This repair and careful calibration made the set as good as new. This set is a keeper.

Regards
Jerry
 
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