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Discussion Starter #1
I am using known brand RCA and Balanced interconnects between components (CD player - Preamp - amplifier - speakers) and banana connects for speaker wire from amplifier to speaker.
Recently an amplifier blew a 5 amp fuse within the amplifier. Can someone directly to a step by step procedure to test connects for interconnects and speakers to determine if they are causing the short.
Also, if the amplifier blew a fuse could this be caused by upstream components or downstream components? I am pretty much a newbie when it comes to electrical work, but I do have a multimeter and common sense.

Here is how I tested speaker wire: Using Ohm meter, I check continuity (red to red and black to black) when wiggling speaker cables and all appear to be good since reading maintained at 0. I then looked for a short within each cable by looking for continuity between red to black cables without issue (maintained reading of 1) while wiggling cable and all appears to be good. If I used the correct procedure for speaker cable testing, what is the procedure for testing my interconnects.
I am trying to test everything prior to replacing the fuse.
Thanks you for your help.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Hmmm
Anyone know how to test interconnects. I have blown fuse on one amp and a replacement amp. I have a short somewhere, just do not know where.
Can not go to shop since we are in quarantine so no music.
 

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Suggest you look for You Tube videos that show you how to use a meter to check for open circuits or short circuits. A short circuit is what can blow a fuse. An open circuit is what cause no sound as the signal isn't transmitting through the cable.

If the speaker cable has 2 completely separate wires, it can't be shorted unless it is happening where you connect the cable.... loose stranded wires sticking out from the receiver terminals will cause shorts.... ditto for loose exposed wires at the speaker terminals.

Some unusual speaker cables have been made over the years and a few of them are capable of damaging amplifiers because the cable causes the amplifier to go into oscillation. Typically, this sort of cable would tend to come from smaller, less well-known cable manufacturers. Some of these have used coaxial cables that have properties that are VERY different from speaker cables.

Lots of time to improve your electrical skills now. Checking audio cables for shorts is the same as checking ANY cable for a short or open circuit.
 

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I unsuccessfully looked for You Tube video specific to speaker wire and interconnects but only found general information.

I described how I tested these the speaker cables in the above post and it appears the cables are functioning correctly without shorts of open circuits. I tested the interconnects using the same methodology using the point and inner wall of the interconnect cables. Example of one interconnect cable while wiggling - Point to point, inner wall to inner wall and the reading was 0 Ohms; then inner wall to point and reading was 1 Ohms. From what I understand, this indicates there are no shorts or open circuits.

I emailed the speaker and interconnect manufacturer (same company) and they responded with "cable (check it with voltmeter. Is the schield totally disconnected from froid and positive signal)?" (they are French). How do you check what they requested be tested with a voltmeter. I asked them to clarify on how to test but have not received a response. Amy idea what they want tested.
 
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