Home Theater Forum and Systems banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My wonderful wife gave me an analog RS meter. I have an Onkyo 705.

When I set up the theater a few months ago a friend of mine came over with his RS meter and had me go through the 705 menu where it gives off static (pink noise?) for each speaker. He sat in the front row with his meter and had me adjust each speaker up until he said stop. I have no idea what number he was stopping at.

Anyway, now that I have my own SLM I am wondering what that magic number is. And after reading a little, I think my friend should have put the meter in front of each speaker, rather than sitting in the front row. And the meter should have been held perpendicular to the speaker instead of him holding it between himself and the speaker.

So without talking about graphs and laptops (way too complicated for me) what's the simpletons way to use this thing. I cannot re-arrange the sofas or move speakers because it's a really small theater and it's set in stone.

Any help would be really appreciated. You guys are great!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,711 Posts
The meter should be placed in the main listening position, where your head would be. It should be set to C weighting. Adjust the speaker trims to get the meter reading 75dB for each speaker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks! I appreciate the basic directions for this newb. When I get better I will worry about getting really detailed.

BTW, most of my readings we way high.

PS. Why 75db?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,604 Posts
The simple answer for "why 75dB" is that 75dB is considered "reference" for the loudness of a satellite channel at the listening position in a home theater, and should correspond to what the test tones in the AVR are designed for.

Also, it's best to aim the meter at each speaker in turn (from where your ears are, as John said) to get the most accurate reading of what that speaker is contributing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,625 Posts
You know the 705 does have Audyssey Multi EQ so you could in theory use that to do the measurements. Or you can use the pink noise from the test tones on your receiver to match the levels of the speakers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
You know the 705 does have Audyssey Multi EQ so you could in theory use that to do the measurements. Or you can use the pink noise from the test tones on your receiver to match the levels of the speakers.
Then I need some direction please. I do use Ausessey as my eq and distance. But what I was doing was using the pink noise tones on the 705 and adjusting the speakers up or down to match 75db on the sound meter. That is how my friend did it originally when he came over when I first set it up.

Am I doing it correctly?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,604 Posts
Well, in theory, both systems should yield valid results, if you're performing both correctly...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Well, in theory, both systems should yield valid results, if you're performing both correctly...
That's true...if I knew how to accurately use the meter, which is why I posted my request for information on how to use it along with the Onkyo 705. Could anyone please chime in as to how to use both in concert?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,711 Posts
There's not much else to tell, just use the Onkyo's test tones and read the levels off the meter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
And just adjust the speakers to read 75db? All the way around, or should some speakers (front) usually be higher than others?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,711 Posts
Yes, all 75dB. A possible exception is the sub, which you may set a little higher according to taste.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,604 Posts
Just try to position the mic in such a way that it should be unaffected by your body... most common way to do this is on a tripod, but in lieu of one, point the meter directly at the speaker in question, and though I've never really experimented with this, try not to stand on a direct line between the speaker and the meter, or on any extension of that line...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the input. When my friend originally came over to calibrate, before I had my own meter, he had them all above 75db and I got used to it. Now it's back down to reference. Thanks guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,604 Posts
Well, ultimately, if you're not near the extremes of the adjustment ranges, and they're all equal, the exact number you choose to make them at doesn't matter so much to most people... if it's a little higher, you'll tend to turn the volume down, if it's a little lower, well...
The exact number is only important when you've just got to know you're listening at exactly reference level, which has benefits, but for most isn't terribly critical...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Get a cheap tripod put the meter on it and set it in your main listening area. Aim the meters mic up in the air. Dont aim the meter at each speaker, you don't look at your surrounds when your watching a movie. Turn your volume on your reciever where you normally listening and adjust each speaker so they read the same db. With the sub you can match the number or go 5 or 10 more to your liking.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top