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A lot of us DIYers use as much testing and modeling as we can find in an attempt to produce a flat frequency response from the driver box combination. Then we apply the driver box combination to the actual listening room only to find that the flat response curve we designed into the driver box combination has turned into a response curve, during actual operation with peaks and valleys that are very noticeable during listening tests. So our final remedy, to again produce an in-room flat response curve, is to apply electronic equalization or speaker placement or a combination of the two to achieve that flat response we think will produce a pleasing sound resembling the original recorded sound spectrum and material.
It has been my experience that in-room response IS boosted at the lower end of the response curve, and THAT boost varies depending on several factors including box placement and type.
Your original inquiry about the two different response curves in the first graph wouldn't necessarily sound (different) but would be louder or softer depending on the specific frequency, possibly with NO noticeable difference in sound quality.
I don't think any of us DIYers would admit to having this speaker building and sound reproduction down to an exact science . . . . it's all still experimental and subjective and in my opinion still an art form.
 

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A difference of 3db is supposed to be the threshold where the human ear can distinguish a difference in loudness.
If you have access to test tones give it a try. Not all humans hearing is alike, some can perceive a 3db difference, some can't. A dbl meter (sound level meter) will help with these experiments
 
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