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Discussion Starter #1
HTS'ers ...

I have an interview on Monday for a Technical Sales position. I would like some tips as I have not had a formal in person interview in a while.

What are some tips.... I though of wearing a black suit, jacket and tie. Is this suggested ?

I could also do dark blue dress Khakis, dress shirt, tie and dark blue blazer....

What say all???

FSCHRIS
 

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First thing to do is NOT take fashion advice from us! Lol
It likely depends on the company, and their image. If the position is face to face, I don't see any reason not to dress all the way up. Especially if you have a suit. It indicates that you're serious. You can always dress like the rest of the Romans once you get the position. On the other hand, option 2 sounds completely appropriate as well. As an employer, I can say no matter what you're wearing, a good HR person will see "you" anyway. Not to say first impressions don't count.
Just be yourself and relax. Hope you can use something in there.
Good luck!!!
 

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Agreed on all counts. To add my 2¢, business "colors" say a lot:
What Colors to Wear to a Job Interview
What the Colors of Your Job Interview Clothes Convey

Excerpt from link immediately above:

Blue: You can't go wrong with darker shades of blue, especially navy. Choosing from this powerful spectrum will project an image of someone who is in control. From the interviewer's point of view, the color blue conjures up calm, stability, trust, truth, confidence and security. These are all great messages to send without saying a word.

Gray: After blue, gray is the second most popular color to wear for an interview. Like darker blue, it’s not a distracting color to the interviewer, which means they’ll be focused more on what you’re saying and how you’re saying it. Gray denotes sophistication, so use it to your advantage.

Black: This is a commanding color and represents authority. Black also connotes drama, so use it carefully when putting together your interview outfit. You may want to use it as an accent -- like in a scarf or tie, for instance -- rather than as the primary color.

Red: This is an extremely powerful color. It's so strong you should only use it as an accent color. Reds are associated with energy, passion, desire, power and aggression. People think of intensity and passion when they see the color red, so use it sparingly, or it could send the wrong message to the interviewer.

White: White shirts and blouses are always a safe bet. It sends the message of simplicity, cleanliness, precision and goodness.
 

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If you are at liberty to tell, what kind of technical sales is this ?
In any case if you are not already intimately familiar with the products start reading.
Under no circumstances during the interview try to bluff your way through a question you do not know the answer to, just tell them you don't know.
I am not in sales but I do on occasion participate in interviewing prospective engineers and technicians, there is absolutely nothing worse a candidate can do than try to blow smoke up my rear-end.
If the trust factor is blown in the interview, there is no chance of a positive recommendation.
 

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Charlie makes excellent points. And I'll throw in another 2¢ ...
Don't just answer, have an answer ready. Quick responses portray focus, confidence and interest. Prepare answers to questions like these, and you'll be well on your way to a successful interview. This is even more important when you're targeting a position you have your heart set on. In any case, treat the interview as a learning experience.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Interview follow up....

Got a gray suit. It was modern fit since i am a slim guy. I went with gray and I felt more comfortable in it than the blue one.

interview was requested as short "30 minute interview" @ 3pm. it lasted a solid 2 hours. there was the main hiring manger and an additional manager i would support. this was for a 'sales engineer' position.

i answered all the question solidly IMO. they threw out some technical questions which i answered some i was not familar with acronyms but they said it was okay. i still understood the concepts.

one piece of feedback i rcv'd is that i answered a question like no one else ever had and they were impressed. actually 2 things. they also asked some behavioral questions such as 'how do you deal with a difficult person you have to work with". I told them I always try to put the other persons shoes on. They have different demands on them and different goals but you need to communicate and find a common ground.

we left with me asking about promotions training and when i could expect to join the team. they said they had to interview a couple more candidates but they wanted references from me.

later than night i emailed a thank you to each interviewer thanking them and pointing out something they told me that i connected with.

I also emailed my references.

the hiring manager advised in an email after that in the same night that he would be out of the office all next week and to follow up with him on the 28th.

the advantages are that they are hiring 2-3 folks so the odds are better for me. when they are only looking for one individual you have to compete against existing relationships since one manager may ask the other manager to take a look at someone.

in my company the hiring manager is always an unknown. how ever 2 weeks before the interview I called about 50 people looking for the hiring manager for this particular job and i reached out to him. the hiring manager actually hired someone without a sales background that is also a positive for me since i dont have a pure sales background. i negotiate and sell solutions internally and externally but not a typical sales position with quotas etc...

i am keeping my fingers crossed that i put in a good enough performance to get an offer.... there is lots of upside here and i still have a job so i am thankful for that and don't take anything for granted.
 

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Scheduling a 30 minute interview for any technical type position seems rather odd to me.
Two hours is much more in line with what I would expect.
The description of the experience seems very positive, hopefully you will get an acceptable offer.
Even if you don't the learning experience will serve you well in your next interview.
Good luck.

Plus you now own a good looking suit.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well Just a follow up, I finally got that job offer from my company. It has upside and some risk but think it should be a step in the right direction. It is for a Application Sales Consultant. basically working with account managers as a technical resource for customers. I would think this would have once been called a "sales engineer" but for some reason this term is not being used as much anymore in the industry. My company has a huge portfolio of products being a big telecom company.
 

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Congratulations.

There is always upside/downside to any promotion.
The first downside that comes to mind is more/harder/longer work....at least that is the way it rolls around here.
 

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Haha, well I think they called the new label and the switch to salary a promotion....I called it no more pay for the OT for doing the same job.
 

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I think it's part of the "I do" clause. As soon as I cross one off the "honey do" list, I get 2 more added. Happy wife...lol
 
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