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Discussion Starter #1
As per title,

Is a 2+2" sub frame/bracing/skeleton suitable for a large sub?

2+2" batton is cheaper and involves less work for internal bracing of a cabinet, so you could build an internal braced skeleton to glue and screw outer panels to with a square and a hand saw, drill and long screws and glue.
So would such an internal construction be prefereable or as good as a 1" chipboard multiple internal panel bracing technique, which would require carefull measurement, routing and many sheets of 1" board with lots of circular holes routed out?

Cheers guys,
Steve
 

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Elite Shackster
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I see no major issue, other than perhaps softwood isnt quite as rigid as MDF. That said I don think the differences would be enough to be a concern. It certainly worth a try though, you'll just need to take care to seal everything properly.

Perhaps someone who has built a sub in this manner will hopefully post their findings too.
 

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There's no way it would be as rigid as the standard style of building an enclosure. If I didn't have the tools to cut the panels on a standard box, I'd get a cabinet maker to make the cuts. To make things simpler and cheaper, you can make 4 sides of the 6 sided box the exact same size. Then make the last 2 sides the same as well, except subtract the thickness of the panel material (.75" for example) from the length.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I am not sure why a figure 8 chipboard brace would be stronger than a 2+2" timber batton figure 8 brace screwed and glued and mortised?

I cannot break apart the timber brace with my hands like I can with the chipboard? And companies like JBL use batton in their big 2x18" cinema subs? So how can less be stiffer when it's not as strong?

With 2x2 you also have more surface area for glueing and screwing even when compared to routing/rebating 1" board?

The cab in question would be around 500L constructed from 1" chipboard. For two 15" or two 18" drivers with a removeable baffle secured by screws.
 

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First, if you know the answer, why did you ask the question?
Second, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE show me the video of you tearing apart a properly glued 'n screwed MDF sub cabinet with your bare hands :coocoo:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
First, if you know the answer, why did you ask the question?
Second, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE show me the video of you tearing apart a properly glued 'n screwed MDF sub cabinet with your bare hands :coocoo:
1st; No need to be patronising, I was asking opinions and advice on bracing, you stated "No Way would it be" in regards to standard enclosure assembly.

2nd; There was no mention of tearing a properly glued and screwed MDF cabinet apart with bare hands, but a window pane style chipboard brace. 1" thick was what I had in mind, and the size of brace I have in question I have broken with my bare hands, 1" + 2" chipboard battons are not that strong, but I have not "ripped" apart a glued and screwed 2x2 equivalent. Hence me wondering what stiffness and strength are measured by in this construction context.

Some cheek, clearly it's you who is a little :coocoo: so I guess I will dismiss your rambling about bracing as you copying what some big boy told you was better as you have not substaniated your opinion and claim with any relevant information or data.

Maybe someone else with help me with an educated opinion of how what why one may be prefereable over the other as a bracing method? Apart from cost.
 

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You're correct and I apologize. I didn't fully read you question. I thought you were talking about constructing an enclosure similar to the way a house is built (construct a skeleton frame and then attach the wall material) as some sort of alternative to the more common method of just gluing n' screwing 6 panels together along their edges.
What "I" do is, after the box is built, I use the speaker hole as an access hole and put in several strips of wood with glue on their ends, and that are long enough to be wedged between opposing panels. I then run a brad or screw from the outside to hold it in place. It's better than nothing :)
 

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I've seen all kinds of bracing, window pane, 2" x 2" skeleton, 2" x 4" skeleton, dowels, redi rod, etc. The purpose of bracing is to eliminate cabinet vibrations, when properly done all types of bracing will work.
Thank you!!

People get on this kick that they are building a sub-box to work as a blast shield for bomb disposal.

NO! A well built box should be strong enough *without* bracing, otherwise your clearly not building it very well. The bracing is to divide panels and reduce flexing/resonance/vibrations.
 
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