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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just bought the last (new) Panasonic TCP50ST60 in Canada. I seldom ever watch a TV any more since I have a 27" iMac on which I watch most of my shows. In fact I probably will put less than 50 hours a year on my new plasma and really only bought it for the times I want an optimal viewing experience (50" is fine since my Genelec pro audio system is set up for near-field listening and I only sit 5' from the screen). Since virtually all my plasma viewing will be movies in 2.40:1 I am concerned that, over the years, the middle of the screen will age (while the upper and lower part won't). Having said that I decided that could stabilize the pixels somewhat by fully burning the screen in first. I watched less than 50 hours of mixed (1.85:1 and 2.40:1) viewing before beginning the process of using Avangelo2's slides to put a full 300 hours on the screen (I will run the slides 23 hours a day for 13 days). With that kind of mileage on the screen I'm wondering if I might be safer using a simple white screen or running a 16:9 blue ray movie in a loop. I'm a little concerned about the slides because I'm not sure they are properly (scientifically) engineered to exactly balance red blue and green pixel aging. Any one have any thoughts on this and are there any better burn in sources than these slides?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When I was talking to a Viera rep she let it slip that the first 200-300 hours were critical. Putting this comment together with the general consensus on burn in and my own background in Physics, I came to the conclusion that the only plausible explanation was that pixels age in a non-linear asymptotic fashion. This would explain why image retention becomes less and less of a problem as the TV ages.
 

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That would be correct, but using slides like this is not necessary. You just need to keep the contrast down and minimize viewing with the same image content like banners and bars for the first few hundred hours. Then, vary the content and do not use max contrast in general. Even after the initial aging period you can still get differential aging in the phosphors with the same image content displayed constantly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I sort of have a unique situation...

That would be correct, but using slides like this is not necessary. You just need to keep the contrast down and minimize viewing with the same image content like banners and bars for the first few hundred hours. Then, vary the content and do not use max contrast in general. Even after the initial aging period you can still get differential aging in the phosphors with the same image content displayed constantly.
Point well taken and, in fact, I think watching regular moving images that fill the screen would likely be the safest way to age the pixels evenly for the first few hundred hours but...
The problem for me is that I only use my TV for the occasional movie release where I want a full cinematic experience. I use my 27" iMac for 99% of my regular viewing which means I only put about 25-50 hours a year on my plasma. Since most movies are 2.40:1 my intention was to initially burn in the screen so that, at the very least, I could minimize the damage that I was doing by watching predominately cinemascope format. Unfortunately at the rate that I use my TV, that would have taken 10 years. Not only would it have taken 10 years but, the for the whole time, I would have had to limit myself to 16:9 content (or had to put up with the distortion zooming to fill the screen). That sort of defeats the purpose of having an nice TV. Since I don't have cable any more and running blue ray disc in a loop for 300 hours might be dangerous (in terms of it freezing up) I decided to use the slides so that I could get the burn in out of the way and just enjoy my TV. I've now put 300 hours on my TCP50ST60 using Angello2's slides and can only keep my fingers crossed that they aged the red, blue and green pixels evenly.
 
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