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Kimber Cable - Evergreen Ballroom



Dennis' Impressions

This room was a lot of fun, watching the cable braiding machine was a bit mesmerizing. This was the very first room I visited, it was very busy and all the representatives were occupied with attendee questions, so I just snapped some pics and moved on.


Wayne's Impressions

Amidst all the high-tech gear, Kimber Kable's cable braiding rig, in operation for decades braiding their base interconnect cable, was as quaint as an old-time taffy-pulling machine. It sat there weaving away - two ground conductors and a signal conductor, each insulated - pony-tail style into a slowly-filling barrel, while we talked about esoteric cable technology.

The principle is actually pretty simple, according to the Kimber reps: Rather than catch the unwanted interference in a shield and have to draw it to ground without it getting into the signal chain, use the twisted conductor approach to make the conductors immune to the interference in the first place.

The advantages of twisted pair in interference rejection are well known. Whether the approach can justify the absence of a shield altogether is a matter for EMI/RFI engineers and lab tests to determine. Kimber also makes shielded cable for more sensitive applications and/or noisier environments. They also make speaker, phono, and power cables.

Kimber's cable braiding machine was the most down-to-earth display in the building. Where some products and demonstrations left one overwhelmed or having to lean on faith, it had a grounding effect. Braided cable. As simple as fresh-pulled saltwater taffy. Good for Kimber Kable.
 

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Its nice to see a cable company keeping their claims comparatively simple, rather than relying on exotic materials, techniques, or pure confusion. I'd love to have seen the braiding machine in action, but I would especially love to have a setup that looks as clean and organized as that rack on display. Now THAT is a thing of beauty.
 

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I just went check out Kimber's website, to see if they had a dealer listing and pricing info. In doing so I read the story on how this company came to be, it was very interesting. It explains how Ray Kimber, the guy who brought this unique way of braiding wire to improve sound quality as well as a host of other things. Check it out, I'm gonna have to give them a call to see if there's anywhere in my area that carries there product, I'm interested in possibly give it a try.
 

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The advantages of twisted pair in interference rejection are well known.
Are interference rejection advantages really well known?? Isn't this part of the whole "connector / wire" "debate / myth"? Or am i just misunderstanding something? I am no expert so please correct me if I am wrong about my interpretation.

Dave
 

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Are interference rejection advantages really well known?? Isn't this part of the whole "connector / wire" "debate / myth"? Or am i just misunderstanding something? I am no expert so please correct me if I am wrong about my interpretation.

Dave
Twisted pairs might work well for low level signal wires, not so useful in speaker cabling. A look inside many audio components will show twisted pairs. I didn't write that quote you posted, but I can link you to info regarding the matter.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twisted_pair

Here, Blue Jeans talks about shielding being the preferred method of rejecting noise in unbalanced signal cables.

http://www.bluejeanscable.com/articles/humrejection.htm
 

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I have been apart of several A/B Kimber comparisons in the past. I formerly enjoyed the PBJ listening sessions. I've been out of the industry since the later part of '96, but would imagine this room to be a fascinating and EAR opening experience.
 

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Are interference rejection advantages really well known?? Isn't this part of the whole "connector / wire" "debate / myth"? Or am i just misunderstanding something? I am no expert so please correct me if I am wrong about my interpretation.

Dave
No myth, the question is the degree to which it is needed in speaker cables. In interconnects I can see it making sense. Network cables and HDMI (and others used in TMDI and other high speed transfer applications) are usually twisted. Good physics behind that.

We did some testing of the early Kimber cable speaker wire and it did, with long runs, roll off the treble more than others (sweeps on a scope with 100 ft runs). For typical runs, we could not tell much difference.
 
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