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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all.
I`ve started to build my new HT, and i`m planning to build it soundproof.
The room will be supplied with traps an diffusors.
I hope to build a great room with great sound and no need for robbing my bank.
This was my old HT.
kionorom1 001.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #3
kionorom1 006.jpg
The last picture, the room is empty, only the concrete floor and walls.
Almost ready to start the build.
I`ll post pics and if anyone have any tips i`ll be very grateful.:hail:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks again Ted, this is realy helpful. I`ll share my plans in this thread.
I think i`ll have a great sounding room thanks to you all.
The room has two doors, i`ve moved one.
kionorom1 005.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #5
One more question, how do i install the wall studs to the concrete wall.
Are resilient clips an option.:help:
 

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Wall studs would not contact concrete wall = decoupled

There are two types of clips. One decouples the frames wall from the joists overhead. This is the DC-04 clip.

The other clip you may be more familiar with is the sound isolation clips like the PAC RSIC-1 or WhisperClip. These isolate the drywall from the stud wall

If the wall itself is separated from the concrete you would benefit from the DC-04s but not the Sound isolation clips
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Wall studs would not contact concrete wall = decoupled

There are two types of clips. One decouples the frames wall from the joists overhead. This is the DC-04 clip.

The other clip you may be more familiar with is the sound isolation clips like the PAC RSIC-1 or WhisperClip. These isolate the drywall from the stud wall

If the wall itself is separated from the concrete you would benefit from the DC-04s but not the Sound isolation clips
Thanks Ted.
The wall itself is separated from the concrete wall, the DC-4 looks great, how many clips should i use in the wall.
lgl
 

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Every 3-4 feet along the top plate of that wall. Again, the stud wall is maybe 1" from the concrete. With a little R13 fiberglass. Then drywall right to that stud wall.

The heavier that wall is, the better. Double 5/8" drywall is perfect
 

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Discussion Starter #9
kionorom2 001.jpg
Do not need two windows, blind both. Now i have better lightcontrol.
Almost ready to start the build.
 

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The only issue with walls inside of walls, lgl, is that this type of build can eat up a lot of floor space and quickly. Sure it does what it does, but is it what you require for the best isolation based on your budget.

And take that low ceiling height into consideration...it only gets lower from here ;)

Adding mass to the upper floor area is a good thing and can reduce sound penetration from upstairs to downstairs, and vice-versa. That should get on your radar screen first no matter what you do.

Have you taken any sound measurements around the house, inside/outside to determine what it is you are up against as far as noise levels go?

Another blip on the radar screen just appeared ;)


You have an idea of what you want I can tell, so plan out all the steps before you take them is my suggestion.
 

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I agree you should have a plan before the nails and screws fly. Not convinced anything would come out of measuring the sound beforehand. 95% of the time casual HT-ers are looking to simply keep as much sound in as possible, not vise-versa.

There are space conserving sound isolation construction techniques.
 

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What would come out of measurements Ted, is knowledge. Knowledge that you are up against a specific noise level. That in itself allows others that can help, like you, to know with better accuracy what the build will require.


Just for the record, 75% of statistics are made up on the spot ;)
 

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What would come out of measurements Ted, is knowledge. Knowledge that you are up against a specific noise level. That in itself allows others that can help, like you, to know with better accuracy what the build will require.
You would spend $ in this budget build to buy equipment to measure the noise coming off the washing machine?

I could be all wrong here, but I believe LGL is looking to keep sound in, not out. A background sound measurement isn't helping.
 

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I would spend 100 dollars to save 100 dollars, yes sir. HT rooms are indulgent to begin with, so waste is subjective.

Also, I will not attempt to measure what is in the head of another human being, too many unknowns. So you are on your own ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hi guys.
My biggest problem is to keep the sound in. I`m live in a quiet neighbor relationship and i am the neighbors nightmare:hush:.
The reason why i am building this soundproof HT is when i tested one Tubesub!!!( i have two) my wife open the door and screaming that either i had to turn down the sound or do i need to glue the plates to the shelves and buy a kidney belt:rofl:.
I have good plans for the room (thanks Ted for your heads up) the biggest problem is to keep the vertikal height. I will describe later
 

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A "background" measurement will tell the builder how quiet it is on the receive sound, i.e. how much noise reduction will be required between the room and the receiver.

He could also measure how loud the sub currently is at the receiver location - then he will know how much additional transmission loss is required.

The problem with cheap sound level meters is that they will not be sensitive enough to measure the quiet background sound level. Another problem is that they may not have the frequency extension down to sub-territory (60Hz and lower). Even an ECM-8000 hooked up to a laptop or computer may not measure low enough in level (say less than 35dBA) although it will work down to 20Hz - then need to read up on how to calibrate the measurement system.

In terms of a room-within-a-room, saving space is the opposite of what is needed to control low frequency sound. That is why it is important to measure first, work out the TL required (i.e. obtain the necessary knowledge) and then design&build.
 

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As I see it there are TWO problems you should consider at the same time - one is keeping the sound in, the other is creating bass absorption! If it were possible to build a room that can keep all the bass in the room, it would sound awful. Bass absorption makes the task of getting good bass sane. Many are forced to use bass traps, but don't realise that the ideal is that the entire room acts as a bass trap. This actually works fairly well with the goal of sound isolation. Multiple layers of drywall with a flexible adhesive in between (like liquid nails) works well.

Your room looks very solid, and I suspect a real challenge. I'm expecting some serious peaks and dips in the response. If you can get some more bass damping then you can reduce the challenge down to something you can work with.

You should pay careful attention to any weak points that will "leak" - doors, windows and any penetrations (power points, downlight holes, services/ducts etc).

Bass is always going to be a challenge to keep in the room.

This may be a challenge, but ideally you want to build a false ceiling that does not touch the existing one at all - neither the structure nor the drywall. Of course, there are different systems available that are low profile. You can attach drywall onto low profile metal frame work with special mounting systems. I've looked into those in the past and the cost can really hike. Another factor is whether this is DIY or not.

Topics like these are covered in a book by Dr Earl Geddes
http://www.gedlee.com/Home_theatre.htm

I don't know of anyone else who actually has a PHD related to small room acoustics. Much of what is published about architectural acoustics is suitable for large scale applications, not domestic home theatres.
 

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This is getting a bit overboard for lgl.

There's nothing to measure up front, since you have no specific sound you're looking to block.

You can incorporate treatments and traps after you build.

Just follow the basics of room construction (as inumerable others have) and build the best walls and ceilings you can. Decouple, absorption, mass and damping.
 
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