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Discussion Starter #1
I am wondering if there is any problem with making a sub that is 4 ft. wide, 12 inches high, and 18 inches deep? This would have a Dayton sd316-88 12 in. driver (30- 1,000 Hz .... res. 25 Hz). My idea would be to mount the driver on a 45 degree angle so it radiates both down and out. It would also make it possible to keep the hight down.

Thanks, Ron
 

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Elite Shackster
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7,142 Posts
A long and low sub is no different to a high and thin sub. Volume is what is most important really. If you want to experiment with things like driver position by simply moving the box, then your planned design might make that a bit more difficult. Also, it sounds as if your vision is to help couple the sub to the room by directly firing it into a corner. This is fine, and not a uncommon practise, but if you find you get excellent performance from your build, and you end up getting to much room gain, it could prove difficult to remove it with a sub you cant just turn round 90 degrees.

The sub will work, and if you have a decent idea of your rooms response then your obviously making your choices for a reason, so go for it I say. Just be aware of the limitations the design may dictate for positioning, so they dont come back to haunt you a little.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Moonfly, Your point about trapping myself is well taken. Part of the reason for the 45 degree mounting was to keep the hight down. The low profile might make it practical to have component shelves above, thus burying the sub for esthetics. I don't know how much space is needed behind the speaker to eliminate back pressure on the cone. Actually, there is a lot I don't know. As an artist by nature I am use to bumbling thru until I get the desired results. Maybe that's not the best way. Yuh think?

Ron
 

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Elite Shackster
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Do you mean the space behind the driver on the inside of the cabinet or outside.

If you want your sub to perform to how you want it to then you will need to plan it out a bit, otherwise you could end up creating a big piece of under performing furniture. I think you need to decide what sort of size your looking at first if aesthetics are your primary concern, and do you have a preference between a ported or sealed sub?

There are a couple things you need to figure out, but once that is done then there is no reason technically why you cant build what you intend to, and the beauty of DIY is you cant build things to your vision more that a manufacturer ever could.
 
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