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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a quick query regarding the master volume position when running an Audyssey auto-calibration, specifically the non-THX-certified type of system as in my Onkyo 605's 2EQ; my 605 doesn't have a "relative" volume scale, i.e. -10dB, 0dB, etc. and instead relies on an absolute scale, such as "0" (minimum) to "99" and "max." Again, this isn't a THX-certified AVR model.

When running Audyssey (which I am contemplating playing with again at some point after I return from a business trip I am leaving for this week) on an AVR such as this, with no "0dB" as a reference point, should the master volume be set at a certain value when the tone sweeps begin? Does this even matter?

I have read on the overwhelming amounts of 605 receiver threads online that some have suggested setting the 605's master volume to around "79" or "80" on the display and then running Audyssey, thus making the 79 or 80 mark the "reference" value to shoot for, but I'm not sure this is correct...

Does it matter where the master volume is left when running Audyssey 2EQ?
 

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I have never played with the 2EQ system from Audyssey but thought that the tones that were given out of the receiver were to hit the standard 75db for most receivers, I always use an SPL meter anyway as I never trust the readings that you get from the standard set of test tones and that can be from a $300 amp to an $4000 amp but would hope that the $4000 amp gets closer readings :bigsmile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have never played with the 2EQ system from Audyssey but thought that the tones that were given out of the receiver were to hit the standard 75db for most receivers, I always use an SPL meter anyway as I never trust the readings that you get from the standard set of test tones and that can be from a $300 amp to an $4000 amp but would hope that the $4000 amp gets closer readings :bigsmile:
Thanks, as always, Recruit/John. :T

So, you're saying that it doesn't matter where the physical volume level of the AVR is set when running the auto system, it should spit out the 75dB test tone no matter what?

I read on some Audyssey setup guide that the system "ignores internal readings such as volume, frequencies, etc." before beginning the auto setup routine, but I just wanted confirmation...
 

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I read on some Audyssey setup guide that the system "ignores internal readings such as volume, frequencies, etc." before beginning the auto setup routine, but I just wanted confirmation...
Confirmed.
 

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Then when you are done with the Audyssey set-up, you can use an SPL meter to find reference volume in relation to your receiver's volume scale.
 

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I posted this in another thread about a similar issue with REF level but it was locked.

When you run the speaker calibration routine to adjust the channel volumes using the readout of your SPL meter, the reciever locks itself at a specified output volume for the pink noise and automatically adjusts the master volume to a certain level: 0, -20, 55 or whatever. It doesn't matter where it is, just that that is your default REF level as long as you calibrate the speakers to 75db at the listening position. You can spin the dial while the pink noise is going and the volume will not increase. Whatever that # is, that it adjusts the volume to during the pink noise speaker calibration routine, is that units REF level set by the manufacturer after you calibrate the individual speaker channels to 75db using the pink noise. For example my Pioneer reciever adjusts itself to -18 when you start the test tones regardless of what it was set at before. ALL av recievers that I've had experience with operate in this manner.


Audyssey acts in the same manner from what I know. It doesn't matter where your master volume is at before you start the routine. The reciever is programmed to set itself to a certain output level for the tests. It then uses the supplied info to make eq, distance and level adjustments to the channels relative to each other.

Basically... No the master volume position doesn't matter for Audyssey or for channel level calibration. The volume controls are decoupled during these routines. The av reciever will itself tell you where your REF setting is defaulted to.

Whatever deviation from 75db that you wish to calibrate your channels to due to personal preference is fine. Some people like to have the sw channel boosted or the cc. Your main left and right should always be 75db and the "control" anchor for the rest of the speakers being used IMHO.
 

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The av reciever will itself tell you where your REF setting is defaulted to.
That's interesting, don't think I've ever noticed that. So he should not need an SPL meter to figure out reference to volume scale. :T
 

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Hello,
Ricci did a much better job of explaining what I was trying to communicate on an earlier Thread about Audyssey Setup and 75 Db Calibration for all Channels being SOP for HT in general.

Having a SPL Meter truly is invaluable and I highly recommend it to anyone who is passionate about getting the best HT experience.
Cheers,
JJ
 

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That's interesting, don't think I've ever noticed that. So he should not need an SPL meter to figure out reference to volume scale. :T
Not quite. You still need an spl meter. The reciever will indicate what master volume setting to use while calibrating the speakers. It does not indicate what channel trim will calibrate your speakers to 75db using the pink noise. You still need the spl meter for that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the replies, guys.

Been out of town, so sorry for the delayed response. So, as I understand it, the master volume position doesn't matter when running Audyssey, but an SPL meter is still necessary?

I understand that certain AVRs that are THX certified are calibrated and can then be monitored via the relative volume scale, a la "-10dB" from reference, etc. but what about AVRs without relative scales, like my 605? How do I know which number ("0" to "99" in the Onkyo's case) is reference value?
 

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When you hit 75db on the SPL meter and have trimmed the levels that is you set for reference level for your AVR, this allows for dynamic peaks on certain soundtracks, as not all are the same and some will hit reference levels at different volumes.
 

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I understand that certain AVRs that are THX certified are calibrated and can then be monitored via the relative volume scale, a la "-10dB" from reference, etc. but what about AVRs without relative scales, like my 605? How do I know which number ("0" to "99" in the Onkyo's case) is reference value?
Run the speaker level calibration routine. Whatever master volume the Onkyo sets itself too is the default REF level volume. Remember it. From there just calibrate the mains and the rest of the speaker to a 75db output level at the listening position using the supplied pink noise. Congratulations... Now grab a beer and enjoy a movie. You'll probably want it a good -15 from the master level you set as ref. It's LOUD.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
There's a suggestion in another 605 thread that on the 605 a volume setting of 82 corresponds to reference level. With your own SPL meter, you would be able to verify this, of course.
Yeah, I'm wondering where the "82" value is coming from; is this just arbitrary?
 
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