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Tried to find this in the manual, but i couldn't

In my studio i have a stereo setup
i can measure with REW either L Speaker and then R speaker
or a stereo measurement

when i measure L & R seperately, i see different curves, when measure stereo i see some kind of mixture/inbetweener.

Now my questions: :)
- When i measure stereo REW is @ -12dbfs, if i go for one unit do i need to raise this to -7dbfs since it's less loud?
- I do have the opportunity to EQ left and right seperately, but since i only measured one at a time, are these measurements and calculated filters still suitable to use for stereo playback?
- If i measure stereo (as in 2 speakers at once), and use the calculated filters in both my left and right EQ, am i then not less accurate?
- Does REW have some kind of function to define your speaker setup and it then just measures one after the other and combines the whole measurement?
- Where can i read more about measurement strategies?

Sorry if some of these are noob questions, but i could not find the answers here.
 

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At the lowest frequencies a measurement with both speakers running may be more representative of the situation encountered with real material as bass content tends to be mixed mono. Some modal resonances which are driven by either speaker alone may not be driven by both running together, so the stereo measurement may show areas that, while they look bad (large peaks) on individual measurements, are less of an issue for any mono content as shown by the stereo measurement. Outside that bass region the speakers behave and can be filtered independently, but the further up in frequency you go the less focussed you need to make any EQ you apply as the specific features of the measurement vary with position, dramatically so as frequency increases, so if there is a general trend of a dip around 1kHz (say) that is evident in a series of measurements in the listening area then a broad filter to counter that could be beneficial, but a specific peak at 1kHz in one position cannot be fixed by a narrow filter there as the result will be very different a very short distance away.
 

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- I do have the opportunity to EQ left and right seperately, but since i only measured one at a time, are these measurements and calculated filters still suitable to use for stereo playback?
- If i measure stereo (as in 2 speakers at once), and use the calculated filters in both my left and right EQ, am i then not less accurate?
In my experience, if you’re using 1/3-octave equalization, you shouldn’t do separate-channel EQ above ~300 Hz. I found that separate EQing higher did strange things to the imaging.

If you have parametric equalization, which is much more precise, you should be able to separate-EQ higher than 300 Hz, maybe something between 500-1000 Hz. Just pay attention to your imaging when using the higher-frequency filters, and if they make things sound strange, then don’t use them.

In either case, as John said, you don’t want to use tight filters, probably no narrower than ~1/4-octave.

Regards,
Wayne
 
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