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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there something that triggers of modes/decay in the measurement procedures, e.g. SPL.

What i am trying to say is if more SPL is set for measurements will that trigger more modes/decay.

Is there a recommendation e.g. SPL to get the most for modes/decay?

Thanks in advance
 

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Is there a recommendation e.g. SPL to get the most for modes/decay?
As already stated, you want to use a high enough SPL to be well above ambient noise levels. Room modes will be activated at any level. Around 80 dB is usually a good number to shoot for. It is high enough to give good meaningful results, yet low enough that there is little-to-no risk of over-driving your amplifier or harming a speaker. Or bothering your neighbors.

Are you using our free Room EQ Wizard tool? The help files contain a ton of useful info.

Let us know if we can help further.

AudiocRaver
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The modes will be there at any level. However they may be easier to see at higher levels since they will be above the background noise.
Others with more experience with REW will be able to guide you better.

Cheers,
Bill.

Thanks Bill

As already stated, you want to use a high enough SPL to be well above ambient noise levels. Room modes will be activated at any level. Around 80 dB is usually a good number to shoot for. It is high enough to give good meaningful results, yet low enough that there is little-to-no risk of over-driving your amplifier or harming a speaker. Or bothering your neighbors.

Are you using our free Room EQ Wizard tool? The help files contain a ton of useful info.

Let us know if we can help further.

AudiocRaver
Thanks

I try to stick to about 75 db

Yes i am using REW.

Is there a standard for decay at a certain db/frequencies e.g. 0-200hz, 75db, 300ms?

Thanks in advance
 

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Is there a standard for decay at a certain db/frequencies e.g. 0-200hz, 75db, 300ms?
I think I'm following you little better now. I am not aware of any need to use different test levels or test techniques while focusing on the low-frequency spectrum. If you are asking about good low-frequency T60 targets for a listening room, numbers around 200 to 300 ms are admirable and usually achievable with some work. Consistency through the entire audio bandwidth is important, but this target becomes harder to achieve at low frequencies, below is 200 Hz, and most rooms other than well treated studios and control rooms have 25 to 50% higher T60 in that frequency range. Hope that helps.
 
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