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Discussion Starter #22
Thanks guys! We've come quite a way in the past week. We're a couple of days behind schedule and due to prior commitments we won't be able to drywall until Monday. We will however be getting insulation done by end of this week, drywall by Wed then mudding by end of week and hopefully paint that weekend. Fingers crossed..

Here's a quick video of the inside now: http://www.vimeo.com/10941134
 

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Does anyone have any suggestions for rack ventilation? We're going to be building a complete enclosure that will be recessed into the 2nd half of the garage but we're not planning on putting any access door on the back. To the right of the rack is a cavity that we're going to use to feed all the cables coming from the ceiling. The cavity will also house all the power strips and transformers etc. This will have an access panel at the rear from the garage. Here's the thing: How well does this need to be ventilated? Should I be considering putting a couple of silent fans in the cavity and have them blow into the rack? What about an exhaust, do I need one? Should I let the air blow back into the room?

[/QUOTE]

Parts express has rack mount ventilation fans with reusable filters on sale i think till the end of the month.:T
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Does anyone have any suggestions for rack ventilation? We're going to be building a complete enclosure that will be recessed into the 2nd half of the garage but we're not planning on putting any access door on the back. To the right of the rack is a cavity that we're going to use to feed all the cables coming from the ceiling. The cavity will also house all the power strips and transformers etc. This will have an access panel at the rear from the garage. Here's the thing: How well does this need to be ventilated? Should I be considering putting a couple of silent fans in the cavity and have them blow into the rack? What about an exhaust, do I need one? Should I let the air blow back into the room?

Parts express has rack mount ventilation fans with reusable filters on sale i think till the end of the month.:T[/QUOTE]

Cool, thanks! Do you have a link?
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Ok everyone here's the dilema of the day. I am debating over whether to put in a brand new fixed 16:9 screen or convert the 106" da-lite retractable high powered screen that I already have into a fixed frame and use that. The only issue with the latter is this screen has sagged somewhat over time creating a V in the middle of the screen. I'm pretty sure it could be stretched out though, but I have no clue if it would work without taking the retractable system apart and removing the screen. The screen itself has about a 2" black border on each side so there should in theory be enough to stretch over a DIY frame. Trying to keep costs low and seems a shame to buy another screen (my 120" Vapex fixed screen won't fit in the new room) when I can leverage what's there.

Thoughts?
 

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Visit the DIY screen section. Mechman and Harp are two fo the most helpful guys on HTS....besides Sonnie and Prof. of course!
 

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in terms of rack cooling, your definitely going to want fans in there. If I unplug my fans it gets HOT and I mean REALLY hot!

I highly highly highly recommend you check out http://www.coolerguys.com/

They have virtually silent fans and temperature triggered on switches (they come on at 87 and off at 80) . I think I paid around $60 for three 120mm fans, the power converter, temperature switch, and extension cords.

When laying out the fans, you have to remember that air flows like water and heat rises. I have two inlet fans and one outlet fan. My inlet fans have a filter in front of them. By having more inflow than out, I have a positive pressure in the cabinet so air is flowing OUT of all the hinge gaps, door openings, etc. If you had more exhaust flow than inflow, then dust and what not from your room would get sucked IN to the cabinet.

I have a three inch gap in front of and behind all my shelves for airflow. The input fans blow straight up the back of the cab and the exhaust fan is located in the center of the cab ceiling. The theory being that having air blow up one side of the cab (back in my case) you get a circular flow of air going.

I think you can google cabinet ventilation and probably find a diagram of what I am talking about.
 

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Ok everyone here's the dilema of the day. I am debating over whether to put in a brand new fixed 16:9 screen or convert the 106" da-lite retractable high powered screen that I already have into a fixed frame and use that. The only issue with the latter is this screen has sagged somewhat over time creating a V in the middle of the screen. I'm pretty sure it could be stretched out though, but I have no clue if it would work without taking the retractable system apart and removing the screen. The screen itself has about a 2" black border on each side so there should in theory be enough to stretch over a DIY frame. Trying to keep costs low and seems a shame to buy another screen (my 120" Vapex fixed screen won't fit in the new room) when I can leverage what's there.

Thoughts?
Totally do-able. Build a hard wood frame. Cut the old screen off and staple to the new frame. I would suggest you invest in a cheap air stapler if you have a compressor and DO NOT SINK THE STAPLES IN ALL THE WAY UNTIL THE SCREEN IS STRETCHED AND THEIR ARE NO WRINKLES!!

I pulled about 50 staples out and re stretched my screen about 4 times before I got it perfect. Make sure your frame has at least one veritcal support in the middle to prevent sagging.

:)
 

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Discussion Starter #29
in terms of rack cooling, your definitely going to want fans in there. If I unplug my fans it gets HOT and I mean REALLY hot!

I highly highly highly recommend you check out http://www.coolerguys.com/

They have virtually silent fans and temperature triggered on switches (they come on at 87 and off at 80) . I think I paid around $60 for three 120mm fans, the power converter, temperature switch, and extension cords.

When laying out the fans, you have to remember that air flows like water and heat rises. I have two inlet fans and one outlet fan. My inlet fans have a filter in front of them. By having more inflow than out, I have a positive pressure in the cabinet so air is flowing OUT of all the hinge gaps, door openings, etc. If you had more exhaust flow than inflow, then dust and what not from your room would get sucked IN to the cabinet.

I have a three inch gap in front of and behind all my shelves for airflow. The input fans blow straight up the back of the cab and the exhaust fan is located in the center of the cab ceiling. The theory being that having air blow up one side of the cab (back in my case) you get a circular flow of air going.

I think you can google cabinet ventilation and probably find a diagram of what I am talking about.
Awesome! I'm checking them out right now. I have to figure out where the fans will go and since I have the cavity on the right of the rack that's the ideal place to put them.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Totally do-able. Build a hard wood frame. Cut the old screen off and staple to the new frame. I would suggest you invest in a cheap air stapler if you have a compressor and DO NOT SINK THE STAPLES IN ALL THE WAY UNTIL THE SCREEN IS STRETCHED AND THEIR ARE NO WRINKLES!!

I pulled about 50 staples out and re stretched my screen about 4 times before I got it perfect. Make sure your frame has at least one veritcal support in the middle to prevent sagging.

:)
Any tips/links on how to build the frame? I think I might just give this a try since I tried selling the screen on Craigslist and no bites so might as well put it to some use! Worth a go eh?
 

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Discussion Starter #31
My buddy and I took the day off yesterday to recharge our brains after frying them with electric and lighting wiring all week. The electrical work took way longer than we expected, mostly due to wiring the Insteon system and moving lights around. We had to move the light that was in the middle of the garage to the other side of the garage, install lights in the riser and after everything was done and because of the Insteon issue with running the sconces off the main load on the keypad and the fact that you can't really control that load properly from other scenes, we had to re-think the lighting and re-wire accordingly. It set us back a good day or so.

Today though we picked up the drywall and insulation and off loaded the sheets into the garage I apologize for the bad pictures but we've been working with the doors closed so as to not attract attention to ourselves by our nosy neighbors.



I have a feeling we've ordered way to much drywall. We had about 44 5/8 sheets and 9 1/2 sheets (for the other side of the garage).

I also grossly underestimated the budget on insulation. If I went with 16" studs we could have got away with 4 bags of R13 which was reduced to $20/bag, but because I went with 24" studs each bag cost me $60 instead!



So apart from picking up the drywall we managed to get all the little jobs done such as completing the entrance, moving lights etc. We also installed duct seal around each of the outlets for extra sound proofing.



Taking the weekend off and on Monday we'll be insulating and then dry walling Tues/Wed (hopefully). Once we get past that stage it'll start looking like a real room. Can't wait...
 

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Discussion Starter #33 (Edited)
Yeah they're pretty nosy in these parts!

So I know paint is at least a week away but I've been researching various color schemes, trying to decide what I like and what will work in the room. I came across this youtube video of a HT with a two-tone neutral paint job and I fell in love with these two:



The only thing is I wouldn't mind a bit of color so wondering if this would work a dark blue, or maybe even burgundy. What do you think?

The other thing is I really would like to put a rope light in some crown molding around the ceiling perimeter (I have it all wired via Insteon) but am afraid that a flat black ceiling will give a less than desirable light spill on the ceiling. Is it THAT bad with rope lights and black ceilings? Should I go with something like the ceiling in the last youtube video?

Your thoughts appreciated!
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Just getting some quotes on mudding & taping after drywall is complete. First quote was $600 for two guys for two days work. Is this reasonable? I am getting more quotes in the week but have no idea if that's good or not?
 

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2 guys, 32 hours total - <$20 per hour if my math is right. Don't know about where you are but that's not bad here. Could do better but could do a LOT worse.

Bryan
 

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Just getting some quotes on mudding & taping after drywall is complete. First quote was $600 for two guys for two days work. Is this reasonable? I am getting more quotes in the week but have no idea if that's good or not?
I'd say not too bad if they are mudding tapeing and sanding and leaving the painting up to you, Thats not bad at all espespecially the sanding part thats such a yucky job ( i've been there) plus they probly have the tools to keep it less messy and dusty. But getting done in two days that seems pretty quick to me as i had to let each coat dry for 2 days before sanding inbetween coats of mud but then again they probly know what they are doing as i had no idea i just gave it a shot.:T
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Does it really take two full days to mud and tape? I would expect them to come in do a coat then come back and sand, but two FULL days seemed a little much (especially when the contractor told me he would use quick mud!).

As an update the insulation is up, the riser is complete and stuffed with pink stuff. Tomorrow we drywall!
 

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To do it right, they'll usually do 3 coats with varying width knives.

Bryan
 

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To do it right, they'll usually do 3 coats with varying width knives.

Bryan
Bryan is right. to do it right there usally needs to be at least three coats spreading the mud wider as they go with different widths of kives and helping to feather it in so you end up with a smooth surface. I'd check with the guys doing the job to find out what there game plan is
 

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Well I can tell you due to just finishing my third coat of spackle, 1st 6" knife then 8" knife then finally 10" knife. Also you can let it dry as long as you want between coatings it will set up better another trick is put a fan in the room to set it quicker just make sure you dont lay the spackle to thick or it will crack when drying. Good luck and my arms are beat!
 
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