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Discussion Starter #1
If MultEQ XT were used in the normal way, in essence to smooth and widen the sweet spot – could, or how would the settings it generates then be modified, to compensate for (in my case recently quantified tests by an audiologist) a drop off in hearing above 2 Khz?

Either by saving the settings generated by MultEQ, then adding boost above 2 Khz;
or displaying the MultEQ generated settings, then manually entering the sum of the MultEQ settings and boost above 2 Khz.

Or will how the two are combined two depend on the specific MultEQ receiver? I have a Denon 2807 off ebay, now on its way to me

Thanks


Thanks
 

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Elite Shackster
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I've always wondered about this myself. The problem I think is getting the right amount of correction for your hearing which would invlovle a pretty complicated session with your audiologist finding out just exactly what your ear's response is above 2khz. Additionally, the ear does not act like a standard room or speaker that needs eq, hearing loss occurs a number of different ways. One is lowered sensitivity to quiet sounds with no effect on sensitivity at louder levels. I think it would be near impossible for a doctor to perscribe a response curve that would match your ear at all levels and conversely impossible to program into an eq.

I think the best thing would be the easiest thing, listen and adjust to taste. Eq your system until it sounds good. Who cares what the doctor thinks, what do you think... my humble advise anyways.
 

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The problem here is that if you wish to adjust the EQ settings on your Denon you have to bypass the MultEQ so it defeats the idea of using it in the first place. I dont have the Denon but there may be some basic tone adjustments for each channel as my Onkyo has that doesn't affect the MultEQ thus allowing you to boost the high mids to your taste while still keeping the MultEQ activated.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have a graph of my ear’s curve from the audiologist, but you’re right for my "personal adjustment," the best thing would be to listen and adjust to taste. The rest of the family &/ or friends will have to put up with a bright sound.

Whether the Denon allows me to work the settings generated by MultEQ, I guess I’ll have to see . .
 

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I have a graph of my ear’s curve from the audiologist, but you’re right for my "personal adjustment," the best thing would be to listen and adjust to taste. The rest of the family &/ or friends will have to put up with a bright sound.
Not only your family and friends but you, too, will have to put up with a sound that is brighter than life as you experience it and adapt to it. A complete compensation has been deemed subjectively unacceptable in two experiments I have done. Set as you would a tone control: to taste.

Whether the Denon allows me to work the settings generated by MultEQ, I guess I’ll have to see . .
I doubt you can use any manual EQ along with MultEQ but most Denons have tone controls which can be.

Kal
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Kal,

> you, too, will have to put up with a sound that is brighter than life as you experience it and adapt to it.
> Set as you would a tone control: to taste.

Good points

If there are tape loops in AVRs(?), and they work the way they "used to",
you could use MultEQ the normal way, then run a graphic EQ (which I have) via the tape loop

If that doesn’t work, tone controls would possibly get close
 
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