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Discussion Starter #1
Just out of curiousity how do you connect multiple subs to a HT reciever that has only 1 LFE output? If you are using plate amps for each of them how do you daisy chain them or split the signal. If you split the signal does it get weak or can you split it without any degredation of the signal?:huh:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That is good to know. I wasn't sure if the strength would weaken by splitting it. I also thought maybe people were using EQs with multiple outs or some other solution.
 

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That is good to know. I wasn't sure if the strength would weaken by splitting it. I also thought maybe people were using EQs with multiple outs or some other solution.
I've always wondered this myself, everyone says no, but you'd think splitting it 4 ways gives 1/4 the signal, right? lol
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Even if it is not an equal division of the strength I figured for sure that there would still be a measurable degradation of the signal like long runs of HDMI etc.
 

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I've always wondered this myself, everyone says no, but you'd think splitting it 4 ways gives 1/4 the signal, right? lol
Even if that was true, that's what your gain knob is for. If the signal is lower you turn the gain up a little to level match.

Also, I think most plate amps have an LFE or RCA out don't they?
 

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The signal that is sent by an RCA connector is just a voltage signal with varying frequency and amplitude. Since a splitter basically places both devices in parallel with the source, the voltage to each device remains the same (Ohm's law) so each device will get the same signal at the same amplitude (voltage) and the same frequency. The only difference is that the source will experience twice the current draw (assuming that the connected devices are identical) and since Line level outs are so low power, it doesn't really have much effect.

The reason why you can have a degradation in signal on very long cable runs is because the resistance of the cable itself will drop the voltage. The long wire basically acts like a resistor in series with the receiver and speaker. A splitter has such low resistance, and is at such a low power, that the voltage drop at the end of a splitter is pretty much negligable.
 

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The signal that is sent by an RCA connector is just a voltage signal with varying frequency and amplitude. Since a splitter basically places both devices in parallel with the source, the voltage to each device remains the same (Ohm's law) so each device will get the same signal at the same amplitude (voltage) and the same frequency. The only difference is that the source will experience twice the current draw (assuming that the connected devices are identical) and since Line level outs are so low power, it doesn't really have much effect.

The reason why you can have a degradation in signal on very long cable runs is because the resistance of the cable itself will drop the voltage. The long wire basically acts like a resistor in series with the receiver and speaker. A splitter has such low resistance, and is at such a low power, that the voltage drop at the end of a splitter is pretty much negligable.
awesome pice of info... thanks eemichael83!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yeah that really clears it up doesn't it. I guess I should not have any worries about adding a splitter or 2 to the LFE line out on my reciever.
 
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