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Most of the damage to the lamp is caused when it is struck. This is because to strike a lamp it requires a high voltage electrical discharge across the electrodes followed by an extremely short period of boost current. This boost current is approximately 3 times the rated lamp current, this is what causes the most damage to the lamp as the electrodes are still cold when this current is pushed through them. (Cold is defined as anything longer than a few seconds). The best lamp lifetime will be achieved if it is struck once and left on, of course for this application it is not a viable option, but if you have been watching a movie and you need to go out it is better to leave the lamp on if you will be back within hour. I have a lamp failure analysis on my computer i'll see if i can find it and upload
 

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Discussion Starter #22
What you say is true. Nevertheless, the impact will not be fatal if this is done only few times in a bulb lifetime.

Waiting for that lamp failure analysis :)
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I'm never having children.

I know what I used to do to my dad's Hi-Fi stuff as a child...
Kids remain much sweeter than any Hi Fi, HT or anything in the world though ;)
 
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Re: Epson TW-2000 (PRO UB) review

[I responded to Blaser about this on another thread in response to his notice and concern about a dimming bulb. The post was moved here by an administrator. My information here seems redundant but slightly different from other's posts on this subject. My reference for the specific numbers below is Panasonic guidelines]

Blaser, I'm sure you know this yourself, but for the sake of others I'll throw out this reminder about a couple of things to consider to extend the bulb's overall life . Running in economy lamp mode will reduce the brightness by 15-20% usually but can extend the overall bulb life by 1/3-1/2 according to most manufacturers' estimates. This assumes the bulb will physically last that long (not blowing because of a flaw in the glass, filament, etc.).

Also, running the bulb for at least 30 minutes before turning it off is helpful. It is a strain on the bulb to be turned on for 10-15 minutes and turned right off. Also, after turning off the bulb, you shouldn't turn it back on for at least 30 minutes for pretty much the same reason. The fan on the projector will cool the bulb enough to not blow from shock. But it should be allowed to cool completely before coming back on; then again let it burn for at least 30 minutes.

Finally, I have read that a bulb should not be burned for more than 10 hours at a time. After that it needs to cycle down and cool completely.

Supposedly all of these things can ehance the bulb life. Obviously exceptions can be made sometimes but to get the full life from the bulb these seem like reasonable guidelines to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Rushfan,

I have moved your post here where it seems more appropriate. We have discussed this matter a bit. Check the thread from the beginning and let us know what you think is correct.

Thank you :)
 
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