Home Theater Forum and Systems banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
649 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't know if I'm overthinking on this but perhaps someone can clear it up for me. When treating a room with broad band adsorbtion, what happens to the natural null of a listening position. For example, if I'm sitting 12 ft. away from the sub, then I'm sitting in the 3/4 point of 70 Hz. Do wall reflections help eliminate this null? So by absorbing reflections, the null would return?

:dizzy:

Thanks for any enlightment.

Bob
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,288 Posts
That can happen. Though normally that 'natural null' is not real. You don't get a null except by cancellation from another wave of opposite phase in the same direction or in the same phase but from opposite directions.

Bryan
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
649 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bryan,

Thank you for your response. Is the part of the soundwave that goes below the axis not considered a null? That may be what's causing my confusion. It's been way too long since I took Physics.

Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Bob,

The frequencies of nulls are related to the distance between you and the room boundaries, not your distance from the speakers. Other nulls are related to the distance between the loudspeakers and the boundaries. In all cases bass traps are the preferred solution. Well, bass traps and also optimizing the listener and speaker placements.

--Ethan
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
649 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, Ethan. I should have know that, but for some reason, I got this thought in my head that the last half of a cycle was a null and would be perceived as such if you were sitting in that location. Senior moment.

Bob
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top