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We are finally getting around to building a deck. I picked up a couple of Boston Acoustic Soundware speakers from Ebay and am planning to mount them under the "roof" (pergola?) that will be over the deck.

My question is, how to run wiring outside. Do I just drill a hole in the side of my house? What do I use to fill up the space around the wires? How do I insulate against the cold and heat?

Also, power. I have a Dayton Audio t-amp that I can use or I have Amphony wireless t-amp or an old Yamaha receiver. I also have a B speaker set available on my Onkyo, but not sure how I would run the speaker wire that far as I don't have access to the walls. Would it be bad to put one of the t-amps outside in some kind of weather-proof container?

Anyway, that is a lot of questions, but I just don't know where to start. Thanks!
 

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You could get a wireless adaptor that tranmits signal from the amp to the speakers but i'm not sure that it's weather proof and there is still wires involved. Otherwise i don't see a problem drilling through the house and sealing around the wires so bugs weather etc. don't come in just find a good spot on and in the house to do so. That is what the cable company does to get wires in the house. Hope this helps.:sn:
 

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We are finally getting around to building a deck. I picked up a couple of Boston Acoustic Soundware speakers from Ebay and am planning to mount them under the "roof" (pergola?) that will be over the deck.

My question is, how to run wiring outside. Do I just drill a hole in the side of my house? What do I use to fill up the space around the wires? How do I insulate against the cold and heat?

Also, power. I have a Dayton Audio t-amp that I can use or I have Amphony wireless t-amp or an old Yamaha receiver. I also have a B speaker set available on my Onkyo, but not sure how I would run the speaker wire that far as I don't have access to the walls. Would it be bad to put one of the t-amps outside in some kind of weather-proof container?

Anyway, that is a lot of questions, but I just don't know where to start. Thanks!
Just use silicone caulk to seal the hole and drill.
 

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As a custom install rough rule of thumb, you need about twice the power for an outdoor speaker. I looked at the model from boston and it's a 4" driver. Playing in to free space rather than indoors, you don't have plane spatial loading (walls, floors and ceilings) to reflect and reinforce the sound. Depending on how far the speakers will be from the listener, it may sound a bit anemic.

There's many outdoor speakers to choose from but I use to prefer the Klipsch outdoors because of their efficiency and price. A muting volume control is also recommended to prevent mistakes from happening (Niles).Wire them with 14 guage...

I certainly understand trying to install things with savings in mind, especially in this economy. But I thought it might be helpful to give you a custom install viewpoint.

Automatic Muting Volume Control :

http://www.nilesaudio.com/product.php?prodID=MVC100R&recordID=High Power Stereo Volume Controls&categoryID=Volume Controls&catcdID=6&prdcdID=FG00968

Klipsch
http://www.klipsch.com/na-en/products/aw-525-overview/


Just one persons input...best of luck
 

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I wouldn't put the amp outside for a couple reasons. A pre-made insulated, weather-proof and power vented enclosure would cost a bundle (even to DIY) and the electronics most likely would not like the extreme temperature differences (unless cooled in summer and heated in winter). Normal ambient room temps for electronics are above 10° C and below 30° C.

It's not a big requirement, but you may want to use outdoor rated wire. It is resistant to rain/snow, UV light, can be buried or put in conduit, and is generally more durable. Low voltage 16 or 14 or 12 gauge outdoor lighting wire may be cheaper (gauge depends on how far you run the wire). You can attach the wire to the wall or the wood posts on your pergola or run it through a conduit.

As for the hole. When you drill a hole in your wall you will be puncturing the two membranes that stop air and water from infiltrating the wall. Past the bricks will be tar paper or Tyvek, then possibly foam insulation or wallboard, then the studs and insulation (also electrical wires possibly), then vapour barrier and sheetrock.

It would be best to cut a hole in the sheetrock at a stud and put on a gasket and an orange low voltage box to maintain the vapour barrier. Use tuck tape to seal the gasket and where the wire enters the vapour barrier. From the outside fill the hole with exterior caulk.
 
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