Home Theater Forum and Systems banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright, so I have been wanting to assemble a sub for a while now and have decided on a woofer and a box...sort of....

I am planning on getting a Dayton RSS315HF-4 with a Dayton 240w plate amp. Box size is a concern, but I like the idea of building a box a little on the small side so it fits my place now and then being able to build a bigger box later down the road if need be.

Here is what I am thinking: build a ported box about 3ft^3 (internal volume) for the Dayton RSS315HF-4. Although WinISD recommends a 5+ft^3 ported box, it models pretty well at the 3ft^3 I was considering building.

Do you all think that a 3ft^3 ported box will be too small for the Dayton 12"?

Thanks all!
 

·
Elite Shackster
Joined
·
7,142 Posts
Reducing box size will ultimately reduce performance a little, as the model no doubt shows. If thats the space you have to work to though, then that pretty much makes the decision for you anyway. Post up your model comparisons, and we can critique them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Do you think compromising performance on the 12" would be better than building an appropriate sized box on a 10"? Would there be much difference between the two? If a 10" performing at its best is better than a sub-performing 12", than maybe that is the way to go.....
 

·
Elite Shackster
Joined
·
7,142 Posts
I would have to look at the models and compare them really ( I dont have the driver files, and its getting late here), but I would still expect the 12" to have the edge in your proffered box size, not least as its common for different sized drivers in a range to use the same voice coil (not checked these particular ones), and the larger cone will displace more air, which gives more depth.

I'll take a look at the models tomorrow when I get chance if no one replies before hand, but I suspect Mike will soon help out here :T
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,625 Posts
Do you think compromising performance on the 12" would be better than building an appropriate sized box on a 10"? Would there be much difference between the two? If a 10" performing at its best is better than a sub-performing 12", than maybe that is the way to go.....
I'd disagree with this idea. The best bet in a size limited build is to go sealed. The 12" sealed optimal size with heavy fill(back 1/3 or box is stuffed with polyfill or 2.5 density mineral wool is 1.75cuft. I'd go this route in your position. I suspect you haven't had a high performance sub before. If not don't be fooled into thinking sealed subs are weak. A sealed sub with a great driver like the Dayton Reference series is a very powerful subs capable of reaching reference levels with ease when properly aligned and well built.

Don't think you need a ported 18" driver for impressive LFE. Most of the builders on our site are bass heads while most people aren't. For an average joe or even a guy that just wants some great bass for his movies an excellent sealed sub will do wonders.

I have a 12" sealed sub so I speak from what I live. For the money you can't really best the build you are looking at. :T
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
i like your thinking! My first idea was to go the sealed route because of the lower box size. However, most people have been advising me against it because of the lower wattage amp I will be using. Do you think the 240w amp would give enough power to deliver good sound? I am not looking to make my dog go deaf, just trying to liven up movies, music and be able to turn it up for the occasional party.

Thanks again for your help!:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,625 Posts
i like your thinking! My first idea was to go the sealed route because of the lower box size. However, most people have been advising me against it because of the lower wattage amp I will be using. Do you think the 240w amp would give enough power to deliver good sound? I am not looking to make my dog go deaf, just trying to liven up movies, music and be able to turn it up for the occasional party.

Thanks again for your help!:D
If you already have it there is no harm in trying it out. You can always upgrade amps later if you don't get enough power. But I can drive my amp with about 250watts from a Behringer A500 so I think you'd be fine.

If you haven't ponied up yet look at getting the Class D Bash amps. They are more efficient than the A/B design. 75db is reference level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I like the price and quality of the A500. Would it run the sub at the appropriate hz; I read somewhere that most pro amps have a low pass filter at 20hz or so (really not sure if this even applies to my application).

Would I need to build an external high pass filter, or would the sub pre-out on my receiver be enough?

Thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,625 Posts
I like the price and quality of the A500. Would it run the sub at the appropriate hz; I read somewhere that most pro amps have a low pass filter at 20hz or so (really not sure if this even applies to my application).

Would I need to build an external high pass filter, or would the sub pre-out on my receiver be enough?

Thanks again!
I'd not suggest the A500 for a sub amp. It does the job, but you'd be better off with a plate amp.

I have to run it on channel 2 or I get nasty feedback when I turn it off and on. It will work, but I'd not buy it for a sub. I plan to eventually use it in my 3-way speakers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Is there any other options for affordable power that you know of? My first idea was to go for the Dayton 240w amp, but I am afraid that it will be underpowered for the sub, and the next step up (500w) is significantly more expensive. Is my thought irrational, would the 240w plate amp be enough for normal listening (music/movies)?

Thanks again for your thoughts!
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top