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Some good basic advice in that article. Too bad there was no mention of reflections in the store vs your living room (as a 'keep in mind') as I noticed there can be a difference based on the lighting used. I've been thinking about a light behind the TV since we got our plasma, might have to look into it a bit more.
 

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Some good basic advice in that article. Too bad there was no mention of reflections in the store vs your living room (as a 'keep in mind') as I noticed there can be a difference based on the lighting used. I've been thinking about a light behind the TV since we got our plasma, might have to look into it a bit more.
Alan would be the man for that! ;)
 

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Great article, just sorta lacking in detail.Like suggesting what can be used around the house as a back light . Instead of giving a link to buy something .
 

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A link was provided.
I did point out there was a link..................................... to sell you something.
but not any ideas on various other ways to solve the problem except the link to buy something
To me that was an article that was an advertizement for a single product .
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I did point out there was a link..................................... to sell you something.
but not any ideas on various other ways to solve the problem except the link to buy something
To me that was an article that was an advertizement for a single product .
You must have read a different article.
 

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I was referring the part of the article that covers Bias light , the part where it says that most reflections can be solved by using a light behind the Display ...

cut & paste from article>
If you can't or don't want to adjust the TV, or buy a 100-inch plasma screen, there are plenty of other options. Moving a lamp behind the TV will raise the ambient light in the room (meaning less eye fatigue) without causing any reflections.

The techie name for this is a bias light. You want this light to be as color-neutral as possible, as any color in the lamp is going to subtract that color from the TV. A red light will make the TV look less red, for example.

You can make your own, or you can buy one from a company like CinemaQuest. <

You must have read a different article.

This is what I was talking about he never tells how to make your own bias light just provides a link to buy one ...

& Yes I did read the same article , thank you

The CinemaQuest link reads like you need a professional like lamps , theirs..............

(Quote) Our products use special lamps that have the same color of light TV professionals use as a reference,TV pictures look more natural when the light in the room is in this color.( unQuote) ,

That using the right color of white light behind the TV helps preserve correct color perception in the picture. I would like to know what color white light they use so that I myself can assemble my own light .
the Cnet article states you can make your own but does not explain what is needed to make your own.

I am Not trying to start an argument with you,

I stated an opinion

I myself am just trying to DIY & save some cash instead buying a product :spend:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I misunderstood your points, although you made it clear enough. A mind is a terrible thing.....sometimes. It's helpful to understand the constraints placed upon authors like Geoffrey, who submit articles focusing on a specific topic and intended for the general public. Venues like CNET want articles that can be a relative quick read for the masses. The author was attempting to cover as many bases as possible within a limited number of words. There are a lot of factors to consider in addressing the topic presented- dealing with screen reflections. Geoffrey and I had never spoken to one another prior to the article. A customer referred me to it. I did send him a thank you e-mail for including the link.

Bias lighting is a relatively simple technique to understand, once the fundamental principles involved are comprehended. I expect very few people have the right components around the house already. Anyone with time on their hands can learn what's required and search their local hardware stores, lighting stores, or the internet for the basic parts. There is no other source that I know of for a comprehensive discussion of the fundamentals and principles of the technique of video bias lighting outside of what I've written. I originated very little of the information, but accumulated what I've presented over many years of research and development. Anyone should be able to study what is on my web site, and/or what I've contributed to the leading home theater forums (this one included), and get what they need to assemble suitable components. There are even a variety of sizes of high quality D65 and 6500K/90+ CRI fluorescent lamps, at internet competitive prices, in my online store, that can be used by DIYs.

I developed my Ideal-Lume products for consumers and professionals who want a proven product that is pre-assembled, adjustable, and reasonably priced. Professionals like: Technicolor, Deluxe, Dolby Labs, etc. use my professional model and also use the consumer models for less critical viewing environments. Many folks don't care to hunt for their own parts and like the idea of using what the pros prefer. There are also a lot of lamps on the market that claim to be 6500K but are not. This is particularly true of LED products from China. It appears that Chinese manufacturers consider any LED that looks bluish white to qualify as "6500K." The many samples I've tested over the years have ranged between 8000K and 16000K!

Best regards and beautiful pictures,
Alan Brown, President
CinemaQuest, Inc.
A Lion AV Consultants Affiliate

"Advancing the art and science of electronic imaging"
 

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have your products and they are an absolute must addition to any home theater environment.



I misunderstood your points, although you made it clear enough. A mind is a terrible thing.....sometimes. It's helpful to understand the constraints placed upon authors like Geoffrey, who submit articles focusing on a specific topic and intended for the general public. Venues like CNET want articles that can be a relative quick read for the masses. The author was attempting to cover as many bases as possible within a limited number of words. There are a lot of factors to consider in addressing the topic presented- dealing with screen reflections. Geoffrey and I had never spoken to one another prior to the article. A customer referred me to it. I did send him a thank you e-mail for including the link.

Bias lighting is a relatively simple technique to understand, once the fundamental principles involved are comprehended. I expect very few people have the right components around the house already. Anyone with time on their hands can learn what's required and search their local hardware stores, lighting stores, or the internet for the basic parts. There is no other source that I know of for a comprehensive discussion of the fundamentals and principles of the technique of video bias lighting outside of what I've written. I originated very little of the information, but accumulated what I've presented over many years of research and development. Anyone should be able to study what is on my web site, and/or what I've contributed to the leading home theater forums (this one included), and get what they need to assemble suitable components. There are even a variety of sizes of high quality D65 and 6500K/90+ CRI fluorescent lamps, at internet competitive prices, in my online store, that can be used by DIYs.

I developed my Ideal-Lume products for consumers and professionals who want a proven product that is pre-assembled, adjustable, and reasonably priced. Professionals like: Technicolor, Deluxe, Dolby Labs, etc. use my professional model and also use the consumer models for less critical viewing environments. Many folks don't care to hunt for their own parts and like the idea of using what the pros prefer. There are also a lot of lamps on the market that claim to be 6500K but are not. This is particularly true of LED products from China. It appears that Chinese manufacturers consider any LED that looks bluish white to qualify as "6500K." The many samples I've tested over the years have ranged between 8000K and 16000K!

Best regards and beautiful pictures,
Alan Brown, President
CinemaQuest, Inc.
A Lion AV Consultants Affiliate

"Advancing the art and science of electronic imaging"
 

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What I was hoping to find was some way to prevent reflections without re-designing the lighting and windows in my home. It seems that the makers of screens have all gone nuts with the high gloss screens. I understand the benefits, but at the cost of becoming a mirror? I’ve been wanting to upgrade to a larger screen, from my current 52", but would rather keep the matt finish and smaller screen, vs. watching a larger mirror with a picture on it. I just wish that the ads or product descriptions would state whether it is a glossy or matt screen. I beleive that the list of Non-Glossy screens would be a very short list, though. I'll just keep waiting and hoping that someone will make a quality 60 - 65" with a real solution to reflections.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
What I was hoping to find was some way to prevent reflections without re-designing the lighting and windows in my home. It seems that the makers of screens have all gone nuts with the high gloss screens. I understand the benefits, but at the cost of becoming a mirror? I’ve been wanting to upgrade to a larger screen, from my current 52", but would rather keep the matt finish and smaller screen, vs. watching a larger mirror with a picture on it. I just wish that the ads or product descriptions would state whether it is a glossy or matt screen. I beleive that the list of Non-Glossy screens would be a very short list, though. I'll just keep waiting and hoping that someone will make a quality 60 - 65" with a real solution to reflections.
Re-designing the lighting is not necessary. Simply turn off the lights that interfere. Then you can decide whether to add bias lighting at minimal cost behind the display.

Re-designing your windows is also not necessary. Light block roller shades can be added for not much money. I did this in my home theater. They take up very little room at the top of the window casing, and can be used to supplement blinds/drapes/etc.

Glossy screens have been around for over a half century. Remember CRTs? That's a lot of "manufacturers gone nuts" when added up over such a long span of time.

I don't recall having much difficulty in recent years finding out which flat panel TVs offer anti-reflective screens. You may have to check for professional models to broaden the selection. They are frequently used as digital signage displays where conflicting lighting is used in the environment as a rule.

Can you be more clear about how you define "real solution to reflections?" It's quite challenging to deal with the laws of physics in some circumstances. I doubt TV manufacturers will ever be able to design a display that can overcome all viewing environment problems. It has been my mission to educate display users, who desire reference image performance, as to what can be done to provide a viewing environment that is compatible. Competing with ambient light will always be a major challenge when viewing electronic displays, especially during dark scenes.
 

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I was merely stating that I was disappointed that the link didn't address my needs.
If you’re the only person in the home, turning off the lights might be a solution, or possibility. Having to shout, "Turn off that Da#! Light!" is a reality.
Adding different curtains or block-out shades IS re-designing.
CRT’s weren’t flat.
While not a complete solution to reflections, matt finishes are manageable.
I didn't think that a comment that I'd like to see some more information on an ad, merited such scrutiny. Sorry that I posted here – Don’t worry! It won’t happen again!
 

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I was merely stating that I was disappointed that the link didn't address my needs.
If you’re the only person in the home, turning off the lights might be a solution, or possibility. Having to shout, "Turn off that Da#! Light!" is a reality.
Adding different curtains or block-out shades IS re-designing.
CRT’s weren’t flat.
While not a complete solution to reflections, matt finishes are manageable.
I didn't think that a comment that I'd like to see some more information on an ad, merited such scrutiny. Sorry that I posted here – Don’t worry! It won’t happen again!
Many CRTs were flat. Most were worse than flat, being convex. A convex glass screen picked up reflections from a wider angle.
Scrutiny? I was simply attempting to clarify your terminology and offer more information that you may not have considered. You can take it or leave it.
You have nothing to be sorry about. Posting in a public forum usually results in comments from the readers.
 

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Who really cares about CRT's anyway? I was just stating that I don't like large, flat, glossy screens that reflect like mirrors, expecially when they ger much blacker than any CRT ever did. I didn't like the reflections in the CRT, either, which resulted in some yelling about the lights as well. At any rate, thank you for reminding me of that.
 
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