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Discussion Starter #1
I've noticed that the best results are booked by solving peak after peak, because one peak can also influence the rest of the respons.
It would be a great option if REW would work in a way that you could work on the biggest peak first, and after that, the second biggest one and so on.

What's your opinion about this?
 

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You could already do that if you wanted, by changing the filters that REW is allowed to optimise. However, REW takes account of the effect of the the various peaks when it optimises the filter settings, the correction for the first peak you work on will usually need to be altered when you address the next peak, which is taken into account by REW so the way it works currently gives a better result.
 

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because one peak can also influence the rest of the respons.
Did you mean to say a peak influences the way response sounds to you? Because a peak had no true "influence" on the rest of a graph. A response curve basically "is what it is," peaks and all. You can always equalize peaks one at a time, if that floats your boat. I've done it before myself.

But to answer your question, not every graph has "cut and dried" peaks. Some have broad or "gently flowing" peaks and valleys. If REW was programmed as you are are discussing, it wouldn't be of much use to those people.

Regards,
Wayne
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You could already do that if you wanted, by changing the filters that REW is allowed to optimise. However, REW takes account of the effect of the the various peaks when it optimises the filter settings, the correction for the first peak you work on will usually need to be altered when you address the next peak, which is taken into account by REW so the way it works currently gives a better result.
Sorry for the late reply, mail troubles... :wits-end:
So you mean that if you disable a filter, it will not be overwritten by a zero value when you send the filter settings to the Behringer?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Did you mean to say a peak influences the way response sounds to you? Because a peak had no true "influence" on the rest of a graph. A response curve basically "is what it is," peaks and all. You can always equalize peaks one at a time, if that floats your boat. I've done it before myself.

But to answer your question, not every graph has "cut and dried" peaks. Some have broad or "gently flowing" peaks and valleys. If REW was programmed as you are are discussing, it wouldn't be of much use to those people.

Regards,
Wayne
A peak at 50Hz will show some influence at 25 or 75Hz. Does REW take that into account?
 

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A peak at 50Hz will show some influence at 25 or 75Hz. Does REW take that into account?
Yes

So you mean that if you disable a filter, it will not be overwritten by a zero value when you send the filter settings to the Behringer?
No, when sending filters to the unit REW will send whatever is currently configured, you need to manually deal with that if not using the automated process.
 
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