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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thanks for all the welcome messages !!!!

Maybe this has already been discussed but ...

I am not very familiar with the REW system since it is not used in professionnal environnments.

(i am a recently retired sound engineer)

Could someone point me in the direction of a site or page where i could learn about it from scratch :scratchhead:

I know what it is supposed to be and to do, but i want to learn how to implement it and use it

Again thanks for the warm welcomes

Philippe Paris, France
 

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Welcome and thanks for joining us! Please visit us often.

You will find REW to be a great tool. Its learning curve is a bit high for some of us, but I suspect that you are familiar with a lot of the terms based on your previous work history.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Welcome and thanks for joining us! Please visit us often.

You will find REW to be a great tool. Its learning curve is a bit high for some of us, but I suspect that you are familiar with a lot of the terms based on your previous work history.
Thank you hjones4841,
i will have a close look to it when i have enough time.
Would you know a thread where someone from this forum explains where he started from and used REW to equalize his room, giving before and after measurements ?
Also, i suspect that a bit of "real" treatment should help, to what extent ?

Philippe
 

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Would you know a thread where someone from this forum explains where he started from and used REW to equalize his room, giving before and after measurements ?
Here’s a good example:

Spridle’s Experiment


Also, i suspect that a bit of "real" treatment should help, to what extent ?
Treatments are intended to minimize reflections and reverberation, and have little to do with equalization. For instance, if you have a “live” room with a lot of hard surfaces, it has a lot of reverberation because the signal reflects and bounces around all over the place, and takes a long time to fade away. Anyone will tell you that an equalizer is no cure for a "live" room, nor is any other electronic device. That requires absorptive treatment, furnishings, etc.

Don't get me wrong, the equalizer is a great tool for what it does. But you have to know and respect its limitations. :T

Regards,
Wayne
 
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