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It would appear that the real DIY "Paint Your Screen" experts are either deceased, or banned from this forum.

As I cannot find any recent responses on a number of questions.

Is my assumption correct?
 

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Don't know about deaths or banning but I built my 110" screen. Used 80/20 square tubing, Wilsonart Designer White laminate, and 2" black velvet tape for the border. Used industrial strength Velcro to attach screen to 80/20 frame. Cost about $200.
 

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It would appear that the real DIY "Paint Your Screen" experts are either deceased, or banned from this forum.

As I cannot find any recent responses on a number of questions.
Is my assumption correct?
I have been building DIY screens for 45 years, originally for film.

I use a very simple formula: Canvas sail material purchased from a sailboat shop and flat white latex paint.

My current screen is a curved 2.76:1 screen (52" x 144") used with a JVC DLA-RS67 projector and a 1.5x anamorphic lens. The frame is wood, with a 2x4 flat rectangle anchored to the wall. 1x2 poplar strips are anchored to the top and bottom 2x4's at the center point of the frame and formed (bent) into an arc and anchored to a series of increasingly long spacers resulting in a 12" deep curved screen that appears to float in space. Make sure to use 1x2 vertical spacers between the top and bottom 1x2's as the shrinkage of the canvas will cause issues if you don't.

It's probably more involved than you would need (or want).

The main points are:
1. Staple or otherwise anchor the canvas to the edges of the frame. It doesn't need to be terribly tight (snug is good) as the water in the latex paint will cause the canvas to shrink. I use white thumb tacks for the purpose. If you are going curved you want the canvas to be tight in the vertical dimension but not in the horizontal to avoid the center of the screen bowing out.

2. Go to a paint store and buy a gallon of pure white flat paint. You can brush it or roll it as you desire. After the first coat dries, apply a second coat. A third coat is optional.

The beauty of this system is that it is extremely forgiving. No possible hot spots or application anomalies to haunt you when watching your favorite movie. I hope this helps.

Vern
 
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