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Discussion Starter #1
This post is simply a heads-up regarding an on-going and annoying problem I had with my Pioneer Pro 610, and the solution.

Within the first few months after purchasing the set, the red convergence would randomly "jitter" to the right, perhaps 1/8 inch, sometimes resulting in a rapid flicker. After numerous complaints to Pioneer, they agreed to have the local Pioneer-approved service company look at it. They swapped out the digital convergence, convergence amp, sub video, and deflection boards, in addition to the red convergence yoke, over a period of a month. Problem was that things would be just dandy when the serviceman left, then, late at night,....

I found the problem by poking around inside the set, from the front, with a busted fly swatter handle (broken things come in handy sometimes). There are three rectangular connectors, with red and blue wires for the convergence yokes, on the deflection board. They appeared to wobble on the board by poking them. I stopped the red convergence from jittering, but I found just by wiggling the blue, I could make it (the convergence) jitter, too. I thought perhaps the pins were badly soldered on the board. Problem came and went over the years, I could temporarily fix it by tapping on the connectors.

When I replaced the convergence chips recently, I decided the check the deflection board for bad solder.

However, the solder on the deflection board was fine, the round pins on the board were sturdy. I decided to take the terminals out of the rectangular connectors to see what was going on (done very carefully by pressing the lock tab with a jeweler's screwdriver and sliding them out), and what I found was surprising.

Unlike a genuine round molex terminal, which is a perfect cylinder that would fit snugly on a round pin, these were cheap imitations - instead of a cylinder, these had a sort of a squarish shape that imitated a cylinder (square + round = bad surface contact). Not only that, the body had a slight taper to it which reduced surface contact even further. Wobbling the connectors made things worse by opening up the surface area - in other words, if these were made correctly (a perfect cylinder), they wouldn't wobble like that at all.

Only thing I could do to improve things was to clean them with contact cleaner and close them up a bit with a small pair of needle-nose pliers. It took a tiny bit of effort to plug them back in, so I know now that the surface contact is better. So far so good, no "jitter" or drifting for a few days now.

So, in conclusion, careful observation and investigation is key to fixing these monsters. Thank you for reading.
 

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Try using a little De-Oxit on the connectors to keep them from oxidizing over time now that you have them more secure.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks lcaillo, I'll try that next time I clean the set. I used an older product called "LPS electro-contact cleaner" which is similar to the really old standby called "Tuner Spray". It supposedly removes oxidation and leaves an anti-corrosion layer, hopefully I'm set for awhile.
 

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Wow, what a discovery! In all the 510/610/710s I have repaired, I have never seen this before. It makes total sense, tho. How cheesy of Pioneer to have such inadequate connectors in there!

For those of you who are experiencing the blue flashing, flickering brightness, convergence instabilty, or total shutdown, STOP USING YOUR SETS NOW BEFORE SOMETHING MORE EXPENSIVE TO FIX happens to your set.

And be sure and see the thread about the need for the PS board to be resoldered on these sets -

http://www.hometheatershack.com/forums/video-displays-processors/13354-pioneer-510-610-710-owners-listen-up-intermittent-ops.html


Mr Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Yep, leave it to me to have the only oddball set in the world. I spent a couple of hours on the internet googling every variation of the term "Pioneer convergence flicker" I could think of, and not one hit. Really think the first service guy, the one who wanted to take off the back mirror box off, screwed them up. LOL- Oh well, things look pretty good now, hope it stays that way.
 

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Really think the first service guy, the one who wanted to take off the back mirror box off, screwed them up.
Hope you didn't let him. The top of the mirror is inserted into a slot in the bulkhead, in the top of the optical cavity.

The bottom comes with you when you pull the back off. The top is not part of what you have in your hands that is being removed, and is suddenly slipped free, and already angled towards the screens. Your mirror woulda cascaded straight into your screen sandwich as soon as it left the slots in the top of the fixed bulkhead, where the top is inserted. The mirror is then allowed to take a nosedive.

The result is not pretty.

There are special screws with very unusual heads in the back, to protect you from yourself. DO NOT DEFEAT THEM. They are there for your protection, and that of your screens - and mirror, which also usually breaks when this happens.

:hissyfit:


Mr Bob
 

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Within the first few months after purchasing the set, the red convergence would randomly "jitter" to the right, perhaps 1/8 inch, sometimes resulting in a rapid flicker.
This can also be caused by the +/- 24v voltage regulators mounted on the PS board going cold solder, as many of the connectors do on that board.


Mr Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hope you didn't let him. The top of the mirror is inserted into a slot in the bulkhead, in the top of the optical cavity.
Thankfully I did some research when I got the set, and was well aware of the box. What alerted me to him attempting removal was , "Huh! What kind of screws are those, anyway?" Got me off the couch real fast.

BTW, I completely re-soldered the PS board. It was definitely the connectors on the deflection board.
 

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I get lots of flak from other techs for providing DIY info on these forums. I keep pointing out that many of the so called "professionals" in our field are actually just yahoos who don't do their homework and are more likely to botch a repair than many DIYers who research more thoroughly. Also, DIYers are often likely to be more thorough and careful not to miss things.
 

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I get lots of flak from other techs for providing DIY info on these forums. I keep pointing out that many of the so called "professionals" in our field are actually just yahoos who don't do their homework and are more likely to botch a repair than many DIYers who research more thoroughly. Also, DIYers are often likely to be more thorough and careful not to miss things.
Well you won't get flak from me Len, as I do the same thing. And yes, there are some very talented DIYers out there, in the calibration areas. The Cars shots on page 45 of the Pioneer Problems thread over at AVS were from a 530 where the owner did all the precision calibration and I just helped out with the deeper optics cleaning and the service menu level grayscale, which he had already done quite well at in User.

The Hitachi threads over there are stellar for teaching owners how to really beef up their Hitachi CRT RPTVs. They have taught me a few things!

:T


Mr Bob
 

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This is what the more closed minded techs miss. Lots of solutions have come from DIYers who have the time to tinker. They are the hobbyists in many cases that drive the business and demand more from their products. Most techs are just interested in making things work at a level of minimal functionality and never look any further.

I can't tell you how many times I have had my skin crawl to see a tech talk about how he did a convergence repair, hit magic focus or did static convergence and the picture was "perfect." Like fingernails on a chalkboard to me...
 

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I can't tell you how many times I have had my skin crawl to see a tech talk about how he did a convergence repair, hit magic focus or did static convergence and the picture was "perfect." Like fingernails on a chalkboard to me...
These are the same people who got there certification out of a cracker jack box:whistling:
They obviously have never put a test grid up on the screen and done a manual convergence.
 

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The sad fact is that many of these are ISCET certified techs. This is pretty much the standard in the industry for tech certification and you have to know your basic electronics pretty well to pass the test. The problem is that knowing basic electronics has nothing to do with how well you understand the performance and application of modern products. It also has nothing to do with whether you care about doing quality work or not. Most techs perceive their job to be finding and changing the defective part. Somewhere along the way, we lost the priority of getting the best out of the product that it can produce.

But then there are a few on the fringe like Mr. Jones and me...staring at the video...and everybody loves us...we will never be lonely...:whistling:
 

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I get lots of flak from other techs for providing DIY info on these forums. I keep pointing out that many of the so called "professionals" in our field are actually just yahoos who don't do their homework and are more likely to botch a repair than many DIYers who research more thoroughly. Also, DIYers are often likely to be more thorough and careful not to miss things.
:T
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Haven't posted in awhile, and I'm glad to report it's been over a year now since I fixed those connectors, and absolutely no "red flicker" whatsoever, the set still looks fine. (had my girlfriend pat me on the back, thank you):T
 

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Just to show what these sets are capable of -

This is from earlier this year: Screenshots from my latest out of town calibration, in Seattle, a Pioneer Elite 720 CRT. More later:





 
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