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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm about to start my "twin tower" project, using 28" sonotube and 2, RL-P18 drivers. What I'm not sure about, though, is what exactly you do with the ends of the "sock" you make from fabric to cover the tube. Can somebody point me to some pictures of someone else's build that shows exactly what happens to the ends of the fabric and how you "finish" these ends to make things look good?

With carpet, I would just cut the carpet a few inches too long and trim it after it's glued, but with a stretchy fabric, I just don't know what to do...
 

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Here's one idea....

First make a cylindrical sock by sewing a seam along the length. Make it longer than you need.

Roll it over the ends before you put the endcaps on.

A bead of glue would work well to hold it into place. You would want the glue line far enough inside the tube as to not interfere with the fit of the endcaps.

Use some top-to-bottom string to lace the ends of the fabric in place while the glue dries, then trim off above the glue line.
 

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As far as I have ever seen, everyone just uses carpet... what sock material do you speak of...? As I will be building my dual sono soon...
A fabric sock is much easier. Get some material that has stretch to it and doesn't allow any light to pass through, sew a seam in it, and stretch it over your tube.

To answer the OP's question, all I did was pull the sock over the edges, fold it inside, and put the endcaps in place. No need for glue or staples or anything like that. The tight fit of the endcaps will hold it in place and keep it very taught. Works great.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So you don't worry about not being able to glue the endcap to the sonotube itself in this case, since the fabric will be between the two? You just rely on the fit of the wood-to-sonotube joint being tight enough that it's air tight?

I'd use regular speaker carpet, but haven't found it in a wide enough cut that I can wrap just one piece around a 28" tube that'll be about 6' long...
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
A fabric sock is much easier. Get some material that has stretch to it and doesn't allow any light to pass through, sew a seam in it, and stretch it over your tube.

To answer the OP's question, all I did was pull the sock over the edges, fold it inside, and put the endcaps in place. No need for glue or staples or anything like that. The tight fit of the endcaps will hold it in place and keep it very taught. Works great.
Steve, did you caulk the joints between the endcaps and the sonotube at all then?
 

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I only caulked the seam for the bottom cap - the top cap is removable with enough hard palm strikes. If your tolerances are tight enough, I see no need to use any type of adhesive between the MDF and tube, and the caulk I used at the seam of the bottom cap was more peace of mind than any practical purpose. That said, my endcaps are definitely air tight.
 

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You might have a problem finding one piece of cloth large enough to make a Steve Callas sky scraper.

3.142 x 28" x height? Better call a hot air balloon maker for an estimate. :devil:
 

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I'd use regular speaker carpet, but haven't found it in a wide enough cut that I can wrap just one piece around a 28" tube that'll be about 6' long...
I am pretty sure that the black carpet a lot of folks (myself included) have been using comes in 6' widths at (obviously) whatever length you need. And despite what some say, it is not difficult to put on the sonotube. In fact, I'd say it was the easiest part of my entire build. Looks great too.

If someone has trouble putting some contact cement on two parts, squaring up the tube with the carpet, and rolling it across...well, there is no hope for them. :whistling:
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the info and the pic, guys. Remaining questions:

-I have some left over TheaterShield Plus that I lined the bottom half of the walls of my room with... would this work acceptably for lining the walls of the sub?

- Do I need to take into account the loss of volume of the enclosure due to whatever I line the walls and the port with, or is this effect negated by the damping of this material actually making the enclosure BIGGER, like it does in a sealed application?

Got my 30" sonotube, 8" sonotube ports, and 5 sheets of 3/4" MDF today. I'll start cutting and posting pictures by the weekend I hope.
 
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