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The movie industry has their own version of what a house curve should be, that suits their purposes.

For instance, they may be reducing below 63 Hz to minimize low frequency bleed-through to adjoining theaters.

Again, the X-curve discussion was only meant to show that house curves are necessary both in production and playback. The X-curve itself is of no use in a home theater, unless one happens to prefer sagging lows and highs.

Regards,
Wayne
 

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Discussion Starter #64
The X-curve itself is of no use in a home theater, unless one happens to prefer sagging lows and highs.
I guess that is where I get a little confused. I figured since the movies are mixed to the x-curve, that trying to match would be a good idea. Then I thought that since a house curve is boosted in the low end that it was trying to compensate for that drop.

Still a little confused but I think I am getting it.
 

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Then I thought that since a house curve is boosted in the low end that it was trying to compensate for that drop.
Nope – the house curve is merely a compensation for your particular room – has nothing specifically to do with movies, actually, because you probably need one even if you only listen to music. :)

Regards,
Wayne
 

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Discussion Starter #66
Thanks again, Wayne.

So, does that mean if a person listened to a speaker (and the speaker measured flat) in an anechoic chamber, it would sound good? And the only reason for the house curve is to compensate for the room acoustics?
 

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So, does that mean if a person listened to a speaker (and the speaker measured flat) in an anechoic chamber, it would sound good?
Couldn’t say – I’ve never heard a speaker in an anechoic chamber. :)

And the only reason for the house curve is to compensate for the room acoustics?
Well, now you’re getting into areas I really don’t know much about. Acoustics has more to do with a room’s reverberation, or lack thereof, and perhaps treating to minimize the same, if needed. A house curve seems to be related primarily to the size of room, and when you include the mids and highs, your physical distance from the speakers. As I noted in Part 2 of the house curve article, I’m more familiar with the “how” than the “why.”

Regards,
Wayne
 
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