Home Theater Forum and Systems banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I bought the BFD FBQ2496 just over a year ago. While it actualy works fine and I'm perfectly happy with it there is a connection problem that does accur several times. Normally when I push the ON button on my BFD my subwoofer receives the signal and turns on also. But sometimes the signal doesn't seem to be send to my subwoofer.

The signal from my receivers comes in fine as I see my BFD's bass meter do it's work. but it doesn't get send to my subwoofer. When I try turning the jack pluck of my BFD's output a bit the connection does come trough and my subwoofer starts working fine. But then during the movie the connection can be bad again without having touched the cable. And so my sub fals asleep in the middle of the movie and yet again I have to play around with the jack plug to get a good connection again.

I already tried changing the cables and another jack plug but I think this is a problem in my BFD.

My SVS PB10 is set to automatic so it should start working when it get's a signal from my BFD.

anyone had this problem before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,514 Posts
anyone had this problem before.
No, but you could simply leave the BFD turned on all the time. Most people do, since the turn on and off tends to create an unwanted thump.

The BFD draws about as much power as a night light. Many devices today (when they are turned off) draw more than a BFD when it's on, so I wouldn't worry too much about wasting energy.

brucek
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,271 Posts

I was going to suggest swapping out that cable between the BFD and sub, but it looks like you've already done that. If you're sure the cable is good, you might try using the BFD's XLR output instead; it's a more secure connection than the 1/4" (just make sure you're using a cable with a Switchcraft or Neutrik plug). If that doesn't get it for you, then it looks like it's probably the BFD. Bypassing it and connecting the sub straight to the receiver would be the confirmation.

Regards,
Wayne
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
wasting energy isn't so much of a worry. It's just that the BFD's filter lights are so bright. And as my HT room os also my bedroom, it would light up my whole room and disturd my night rest. :p
Maybe I can tape something over it. I've heard there are dark plastics to darken the lights, but haven't found them so far.

Why would I still need a Neutrik plug if I already use a XLR on one end and cinch on the other end?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,514 Posts
Why would I still need a Neutrik plug if I already use a XLR
You wouldn't - Wayne thought you were using 1/4" and he was suggesting to try the XLR.

Maybe I can tape something over it.
As I assume that the RED LED's are the offending light, you could simply program the next slot (i.e. program 5 if you're presently using 4), and set all the filters to off. Then you can switch betwen the two programs instead of turning it on and off.

brucek
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
As I assume that the RED LED's are the offending light, you could simply program the next slot (i.e. program 5 if you're presently using 4), and set all the filters to off. Then you can switch betwen the two programs instead of turning it on and off.

brucek
oops, that got a little confusing. This is a noob you're talking to here. :dumbcrazy:
I don't know my BFD that well.

also the display next to the wheel wich always says RUN is kinda bright.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
You could try car window tinting, I assume folks in Belgium have tinted windows. Take the BFD to a tint shop and ask them if they have a scrap that will fit the display area.

A piece of tinted plexi would work, too.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,271 Posts

Why would I still need a Neutrik plug if I already use a XLR on one end and cinch on the other end?
Yeah, like brucek said, I assumed you were using a 1/4" plug when you said you "turn[ed] the jack pluck [sic] of my BFD's output a bit," because how exactly does one manage to turn an XLR plug? :huh:

Maybe you meant the cable, but if you can actually do that, then I'd say the cable definitely has a problem, because the internal connection (i.e. inside the XLR) is no longer secure.

Even if the connection is secure, it could still be your cable - more specifically the XLR plug itself. A lot of people make the mistake of buying cheap mic cables not realizing that the female connectors are junk, living on borrowed time. Take a look at this picture that compares a cheap and quality connector:


Female XLR plugs enhanced w-highlight.JPG


The bottom connector is a Switchcraft, the top is some no-name something-or-another. See the little ball at the business end of Switchcraft? The Switchcraft has two of those, and they are spring loaded. The purpose they serve is to maintain a tight pressure connection in the socket they are plugged into.

Now look at the cheap connector at the top. It has no spring-loaded balls. All it has is a couple of "bulging tabs" to ensure a good connection (for lack of a better term - one of them seen here between the two dark strips). The problem is that over time, the tabs collapse, and you end up with a goose-loose connection that has a lot of flex and give. That in turn wallows out the plug's three sockets, which then can easily make and break connection. So basically, the whole mechanical structure of the connector is compromised.

So you might want to take a look at the cable. If it has one of these cheap female XLRs, change it out and see if that helps. If you can solder, it's no big deal to replace it with a Switchcraft or Neutrik plug.

Regards,
Wayne
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top