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Tint Codes

The credit to this goes to tiddler and Harpmaker.

Some of these colors can be had by using "Glidden Master Palette" in the paint database at Lowe's.

Tint Code ... "Color Name" [Munsell Value] - RGB - CIELab

00NN 05/000 . . . "Dark Secret" (black) [N2.3]
00NN 07/000 . . . "Deep Onyx" (black) [N3.2]
00NN 13/000 . . . "Obsidian Glass" [N4.3]
00NN 16/000 . . . "Grey Tabby" [N4.7]
00NN 20/000 . . . "Grimmy's Grey" [N5.2]
00NN 25/000 . . . "Seal Grey" [N5.7]
00NN 31/000 . . . "Icon Grey" [N6.25]
00NN 37/000 . . . "Granite Gray" [N6.7] - 162 162 161 - 66.62 -0.02 -0.28
00NN 45/000 . . . "Dover Grey" [N7.3] - 175 176 175 - 71.73 -0.04 -0.28
00NN 53/000 . . . "Veil" [N7.8] - 190 190 189 - 76.99 -0.02 -0.11
00NN 62/000 . . . "Universal Gray" [N8.3] - 206 206 205 - 82.83 -0.21 -0.37
00NN 72/000 . . . "Snowfield" [N8.8] - 219 220 219 - 87.68 -0.3 -0.3


British neutrals:
Dulux paint in standard matt or vinyl matt finish:

1) 00NN 53/000 clouded slate 2, grey steel 2 [N7.8]
2) 00NN 62/000 ebony mists 5 [N8.3]
3) 00NN 72/000 clouded slate 3, grey steel 3 [N8.8]
4) 00NN 83/000 clouded slate 4, grey steel 4 [N9.3]


NCS neutral color codes taken from http://www.ncscolour.com/en/ncs/ncs-navigator/ via a color picker program.

S 0300-N = N9.6
S 0500-N = N9.4
S 1000-N = N8.9
S 1500-N = N8.4
S 2000-N = N8.0
S 2500-N = N7.6
S 3000-N = N7.2
S 3500-N = N6.8
S 4000-N = N6.3
S 4500-N = N5.9
S 5000-N = N5.6
S 5500-N = N5.2
S 6000-N = N4.8
S 6500-N = N4.3
S 7000-N = N3.9
S 7500-N = N3.4
S 8000-N = N2.7
S 8500-N = N1.9
S 9000-N = N0.9


RAL Classic neutrals. RGB values are said by site to be approximate.

No code has to be inserted here.


RAL Design neutrals. The middle number of the color code is the N value times 10.

No code has to be inserted here.



Munsell neutral color values

No code has to be inserted here.

White - the brightest, and most neutral, white we have measured is the Glidden Premium Paint GLN9000 from Home Depot.


These tint codes should be available at most, if not all paint stores. The proper way to ask for these would be to ask like this "I need a quart of Valspar Ultra Premium Eggsheel tinted to the Glidden Master Pallette color Veil." The paint person should then go to their computer and look up that particular color and mix it up for you.

Finishes

Flat
Flat Enamel or Matte
Eggshell
Satin
Semi-Gloss
Gloss

These are finishes that we are certain do not hot spot.

Valspar Ultra Premium up to an eggshell finish.

The Sherwin-Williams ProClassic satin is similar to the Valspar eggshell.

Glidden Premium matte or less - eggshell is too glossy.

Behr finishes used to be similar to Valspar Ultra Premium.

PPG Grand Distinction in an eggshell finish does not hot spot.


If you know of other lines that do not hot spot, let us know here in this thread and I'll add them to the database.
 

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For the white paint have you tested the Liquitex titanium white? I'm in France and have problems sourcing the Glidden professional (or Delux professional). I've sourced the Liquitex and it seems much whiter then any of my other alternatives.
 

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For the white paint have you tested the Liquitex titanium white? I'm in France and have problems sourcing the Glidden professional (or Delux professional). I've sourced the Liquitex and it seems much whiter then any of my other alternatives.
Are you referring to the Liquitex BASICS line of paints? These are listed by Liquitex as being a satin finish and they will hot spot if used as a screen mix. The more expensive line of Liquitex Heavy Body Professional Acrylics have even more gloss.

I have not found the artist acrylic Titanium White paints to be significantly whiter than the bright white latex house paints here in the U.S., but I can't speak for your paints in France. If you would like to send samples (about 2 cm square) of any paints you want tested for color or brightness just PM Mech or myself and we will send you our address. Such samples can simply be mailed like a letter. We will test them with our spectrophotometers and usually report the findings to you the same day we get the sample.







 

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I just thought of something. Can you get the Dulux Light and Space? Here's a UK link. That would be a good white option. Outside of that, what other paint brands do you have available? Not artist paints but interior home paint.

Here's a link to the French Dulux site.
While the French site has the light and space listed, I've tried hard to find it in many of the big stores that sell their Dulux paints. None are carrying the light and space.
 

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Are you referring to the Liquitex BASICS line of paints? These are listed by Liquitex as being a satin finish and they will hot spot if used as a screen mix.

Yes its the basics line. I also have access to some other artist acrylic titanium or something called vivid white. I saw your previous note that Liquitex is to glossy so I have used the suggestion in the below thread to mix it with medium matte.

http://www.hometheatershack.com/forums/diy-screen-development-testing/51685-titanium-sintra-development.html

How do I read the tests that you have done? I see the RGB values and the need for them to be close together for neutrality. What about the other numbers on the side? Does reflectivity mean gain?
 

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Yes its the basics line. I also have access to some other artist acrylic titanium or something called vivid white. I saw your previous note that Liquitex is to glossy so I have used the suggestion in the below thread to mix it with medium matte.

http://www.hometheatershack.com/forums/diy-screen-development-testing/51685-titanium-sintra-development.html
The idea behind mixing Liquitex Matte Medium with a paint, or paint mix, that hot spots by itself is to use the flattening agent in the Matte Medium to cut down on the gloss of the entire mix. This will work after a fashion, but the Matte Medium isn't totally clear so the more of it you add to your paint or mix the more it will drift toward yellow. Also the more Matte Medium that a mix contains the more translucent the mix will be and the greater the potential the mix will soften a projected image.

In your case where you are trying to get the whitest paint you can I would try adding some regular white water-based interior house paint to the BASICS Titanium Dioxide. It probably won't take much to decrease the gloss level so it won't hot spot.

How do I read the tests that you have done? I see the RGB values and the need for them to be close together for neutrality. What about the other numbers on the side? Does reflectivity mean gain?
We use the CIELAB color space (also called L*a*b*) since it is one of the most respected and used ways of listing the color and lightness of a number of surfaces. The L* value can range from 100 (pure white) to 0 (pure black). The a* value denotes the amount of red or green in a color, positive values mean red and negative values mean green. The b* value denotes the amount of yellow and blue in a color, positive values mean yellow and negative values mean blue. The higher the value of a* or b* (no matter if it's positive or negative) the more intense the color is. In theory, both the a* and b* values should be 0.0 for a color to be a perfect neutral gray, but in the real world things just aren't that precise. Wbassett actually went back to school to learn about color science and in consultation with Dr. Mark D. Fairchild (a preeminent color scientist who recently completed 12 years as Director of the Munsell Color Science Laboratory) developed the neutrality standards we use for screens here at HTS. If both a* and b* are 0.5 or lower the color is neutral. If a* and b* are 1.0 to 0.5 the color is near-neutral. If a* and b* are 2.0 to 1.0 the color is acceptably neutral (meaning many projectors can compensate for the color "push" of the screen).

The N values we talk about frequently are the CIELAB L* values divided by 10. This value is used in the Munsell Color Space where it is called "V". The "N" is added when a color is considered to be a neutral gray thus it stands for "Neutral".

The RGB (more accurately the sRGB) color space data is added to our charts since that data can be entered into many paint programs so people can get an idea of what the color looks like. For reasons I won't go into here the RGB color space is not very accurate, but people want that data so we provide it.

The numbers on the side of the Spectral Reflectance Curve chart denote the percentage of reflectance of the individual wavelengths of light. My older spectrophotometer (an X-rite DTP-22) measured from 400 to 700 nanometers (by many considered the visible spectrum), but my newer X-rite i1 Pro spectro measures from 380 to 730 nanometers (a bit into the ultraviolet and infrared).

The color bar that runs along the bottom of the chart is reported to be a fairly accurate representation of the visual color response of the human eye at the individual wavelengths. You will notice that at frequencies greater than 690 nm and less than 420 nm the visual response is almost black, this is due to the poor perception of these wavelengths by the human eye.

Wavelength reflectivity is only one part of what is commonly known as "gain". The full term is "peak gain" because not only is screen color brightness or whiteness part of that screen attribute, but so is specular reflectance. The brighter or whiter a color is the more gain it will have, but also the more surface gloss a screen has the more gain it will have since more light is reflected back toward the viewer. The problem with gain resulting from surface gloss is that it will result in the screen hot spotting if it's too glossy.

The spectrophotometers that we use are designed to NOT see surface gloss and the reflectance values it reports are for what is called a Lambertian surface. This is a surface that has no gloss whatsoever and reflects light in all directions equally.
 

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I got a gallon of Glidden Duo (paint + primer) flat at HD, tinted to Universal Gray. It was sort of unintentional; I meant to get Glidden Premium without the primer, but I thought, what the , I'll try it.

It worked great. No evidence of hotspotting.

I rolled on about a quart with a 1/4" roller, covering 100 sq ft of wall. I was planning to do two coats, but there was just no point. I had to touch up a few spots near the edges where my cut-in to the trim wasn't quite solid, but the main rolled field was covered very evenly with the one coat.

It went over some greenish interior latex, plus some lines of white spackling where I filled cracks.

No problems whatsoever.
 

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I got a gallon of Glidden Duo (paint + primer) flat at HD, tinted to Universal Gray. It was sort of unintentional; I meant to get Glidden Premium without the primer, but I thought, what the , I'll try it.

It worked great. No evidence of hotspotting.

I rolled on about a quart with a 1/4" roller, covering 100 sq ft of wall. I was planning to do two coats, but there was just no point. I had to touch up a few spots near the edges where my cut-in to the trim wasn't quite solid, but the main rolled field was covered very evenly with the one coat.

It went over some greenish interior latex, plus some lines of white spackling where I filled cracks.

No problems whatsoever.
Welcome to HTS! :wave:

Glad to hear the Glidden Duo worked for you. :T
 

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How would Grimmy's Grey work out for a screen? I want absolute black blacks, what I am trying to do is reduce the light from the projector on black scenes. I know I will lose some super white colors, but it is acceptable for deeper blacks. Currently using a BW.

My specs:
JVC RS45
92 inch screen
Dark grey ceiling
Black curtained walls.
Light carpet floor.
Seated 10.5 feet from screen.
 

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Can I use ceiling white as the base, it is super flat and non reflective, but it has that small amount of Lamp Black in it. How would this effect the finished RGB blanace?
 

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So I've been testing 3 different samples of neutral grays these last few days trying to narrow down my options. I've snapped a few pictures as well hoping that they may help someone else one day with this same kind of comparison.

The 3 colors I'm testing are "Grimmy's Grey" (N5.2), "Icon Grey" (N6.25) and "Granite Gray" (N6.7). The screen itself is around an N8.0 I believe? It is "Carl's FlexGray" screen material.

In the photos the smaller sample on the left is "Granite Gray", the upper portion of the large sample is "Icon Grey" and the lower portion is "Grimmy's Grey". Some photos are with lights on, most are with lights off.

I'm still torn between these 3 colors and cannot come to a decision. Each one looks pretty good, I feel the Grimmy's Grey may be a little too dark.

The screen is 80" and the projector is a BenQ W1070. I'm trying to cut down on the brightness of the picture, even with all the lights off the reflected light is lighting up the room pretty well.

Any advice is greatly appreciated

Album here:
http://imgur.com/a/lMQrh
 

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Well, let's do some math...:)

80'' screen in 1,78:1 means 1,80 s.m.

Grimmys Grey's gain is about 0.25 (paint plus finish)
Icon Grey's gain is about 0.33 (paint plus finish)
Granite Gray's gain is about 0.35 (paint plus finish)

Benq on low lamp and cinema mode (without calibration) outputs around 850 lumens. So:

On GG you 'll have 10,97 FL, on IG 14,48 FL and on GG 15,36 FL.

Considering over time that the lamp will lose power, i would say Granite Gray or even a tad lighter would be the wiser choice.
 
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