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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I'm getting an Outlaw sub. It apparently has a port plug that allows the sub to go down to 18hz by plugging up one of the two ports. Would this have any detrimental effects on the sub? I'm mainly concerned about heat distribution and or life span of the sub.

Thanks,
H.
 

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Plugging a port will not have detrimental effects on the sub really. You will lose some maximum output by plugging a port, but other than that nothing really.

Heat will likely not be an issue. The only thing to monitor is if you are listening to the sub and you hear some loud distortion, chuffing, or clacking then you may want to unplug the port. Those type of sounds usually mean you have reached the limits of the subs capabilities.

Hope this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Jon,

Thanks for answering my question concerning heat. I read that the ports are there to cool the innards, so I was initially concerned about plugging one of them up.

I’m still new to this so bear with me. If I’m hearing the “distortion, chuffing, or clacking” noises, can I do something else to eliminate that? What about turning down the subwoofer volume? That would keep the lower frequency and not reach the subwoofer threshold, right?

I don’t necessarily need the sub to shake walls since I’m in an apartment like dwelling. But putting in the port lowers the maximum output in exchange for a lower extension. So I’d rather feel it go low than just massively put out bass.

Or if my understanding is completely off, please elaborate.
Thanks,
H.
 

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If you are getting to the point you would hear distortion, chuffing, clacking, etc. you would need to turn down the subwoofer and/or volume before any damage is done. If you find yourself getting to that point more than a couple times, you may look into getting another sub or a bigger sub to handle your needs. Aside from that, especially in your apartment, I doubt you will get to that point often enough if at all.
 

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Generally speaking, the port is used to increase the sub's output and extend the flat range of its frequency response without increasing the size of the cabinet. I would be surprised if a reputable manufacturer relied on this airflow for cooling purposes. They certainly wouldn't if they themselves MFR a plug to adjust the tuning of their subs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If you are getting to the point you would hear distortion, chuffing, clacking, etc. you would need to turn down the subwoofer and/or volume before any damage is done. If you find yourself getting to that point more than a couple times, you may look into getting another sub or a bigger sub to handle your needs. Aside from that, especially in your apartment, I doubt you will get to that point often enough if at all.

Hi,

That makes me feel better that I'll likely not get to the maximum point of where my sub can't handle it. I mean, it would be played at low to moderate volume level at the MOST. Of course, I don't know how that works as I get into the low end of the frequency.

Hmm... so, uh... how does that work? (e.g. movies where I can literally feel the shaking) I can have a situation where I'd feel it shaking (due to the low frequency of the subwoofer) and have the overall speaker/sub volume low, correct? Or does it work 1:1 where volume corresponds to shakiness?

Thanks,
H.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Generally speaking, the port is used to increase the sub's output and extend the flat range of its frequency response without increasing the size of the cabinet. I would be surprised if a reputable manufacturer relied on this airflow for cooling purposes. They certainly wouldn't if they themselves MFR a plug to adjust the tuning of their subs.
Hi,

I see that your reasoning makes sense now. Because I'm so new at this, my logic at the time of my posting was perhaps skewed. Just because it can do it, doesn't mean that it should do that all of the time.

Car analogy: Just because a 4 cylinder car can go 120MPH, doesn't mean that it should do that all of the time. It would, in theory, not last as long as a car that's constantly driven at it's optimal speed - let's say 60MPH.

So by my thinking a sub would last 15 years, but if I plugged one of the holes, then what if by a slight reduction in cooling it would only last 10 years due to it running only slightly out of optimal conditions.

So, thanks again for giving perspective. My overactive "what-if" imagination again!
H
 
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