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Hey,

After lots of disappointment with cheap China-screens I will now build my own. I want to use the Black Widow paint, but I would also like to use the Cheap Trick screen. Is there any experience with painting the Cheap Trick Screen at all? I couln't find any.. Do you have any tips? Even if you tell me it's not gonna work, I will still try it.. ;)

Would rolling or spraying be best to not clog the holes? I thought of mounting the screen on a frame and spraying it lying down from the front and right afterwards spraying with air from the back to open the holes again, but that might influence the texture on the front. I will do some tests next week, maybe some of you can help.
 

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Hi Yougle,welcome to HTS! :wave:

I've never heard of the Cheap Trick screen, but I would imagine you could paint it as long as regular interior house paint would stick to it since BW™ is 80% house paint.

I would spray the screen (preferably using an HVLP spray gun) and I would dilute the BW™ with around 40% water and spray many light coats of paint rather than trying to spray fewer coats of unthinned BW™.

Good luck and please let us know how your experimentation works out. :T
 

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The Cheap Trick Screen is a Phifer SheerWeave. Its a cloth for window blinds and works very well as white home theatre screens. It's acoustically transparent and only costs 33,50€ per m².

(I would post images, but the forum won't let me -.-)

I have two sprayguns. But I think they are too small for an area this large.

(the image problem again -.-)

On a German forum the one introducing BW had the problem of little aluminum puddles when he diluted the paint and the aluminum flakes clogged his spraygun. Is that a common problem? After he postet that nobody else dared spraying.
 

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The Cheap Trick Screen is a Phifer SheerWeave. Its a cloth for window blinds and works very well as white home theatre screens. It's acoustically transparent and only costs 33,50€ per m².

(I would post images, but the forum won't let me -.-)
I have heard of painting SheerWeave fabric to make a screen, but it was a long time ago. The person had to thin their mix by adding 40% water. The holes were not plugged with paint.

I have two sprayguns. But I think they are too small for an area this large.
I would think that the inexpensive Chinese-made HVLP guns would be available in Germany, but I'm not sure. Earlx makes a excellent relatively inexpensive turbine HVLP system http://www.earlex.de/

On a German forum the one introducing BW had the problem of little aluminum puddles when he diluted the paint and the aluminum flakes clogged his spraygun. Is that a common problem? After he postet that nobody else dared spraying.
I'm not familiar with any German forums since I don't speak German, but the Auto Air paints are designed to be sprayed through airbrushes so I don't think larger spraying tips in bigger guns would cause a problem. My compressor-powered HVLP gun uses a 1.4 mm tip and I have never had a problem. I have also never heard of anyone else having clogging problems because of the aluminum flakes either. :huh:

If you thin BW™ 40% then it's a good idea to give the paint in the sprayer a stir before applying another coat after letting the previous coat dry. I have found that I can usually just swirl the paint in the cup using my wrist alone and not have to open the cup and use a stirring stick.

You don't want to have any puddles of paint on your screen after spraying since this will cause uneven reflectivity. This is usually caused by too much texture in the substrate being sprayed. The person that sprayed their SheerWeave 4500 fabric had no such problems.
 

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Before you paint an entire screen, you may want to paint a test patch. Do you have a way to test the material acoustically? My problem with painting and I have done this on perforated leather is the paint will build up on the side of the holes. This could impede sound transmission.
 

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We have a hardware store here where you can lend all kinds of tools for a fee. I have to call them, maybe they also have sprayguns and compressors.

I will defninetly try it on some samples before ruining a 150€ screen! ;)

The only way I can test the acoustical transparency is to place it in front of my speaker. Yes, I thought about the paint narrowing the holes. I guess I will have to test it.
 

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We have a hardware store here where you can lend all kinds of tools for a fee. I have to call them, maybe they also have sprayguns and compressors.
You might not have to use a compressor-based HVLP system; Wagner makes several electric HVLP models (I'm not sure what they would be called in Germany) and then there are the electric turbine powdered models like the Earlex. These work quite well. The Earlex models can use 1.4 mm nozzles while the Wagner guns are usually 2.0 mm (which still work for painting screens).
 

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I wanted to go with a Wagner spraygun but I just found out that the model I wanted doesn't work with latex paint. My new projector arrived yesterday. An Optoma GT750 replacing my Optoma HD20. Awesome picture on a gray wall. Now I can order my 120" 21:9 screen to replace my 100" 16:9 screen.

I had a look at my spraygun, they are just for spraying models, The compressor is only 1bar 10 l/min and my spraygun has 0.5, 0.7 and 1.1mm nozzles. The 1.1mm only sprays an area with 50mm diameter, could be quite tiring spraying a 120" screen.

Will the screen still be flexible/strechable after beeing painted so I can then mount it onto the frame? Or would the paint rip?

How much paint do I need for a 120" 21:9 screen?
 

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I wanted to go with a Wagner spraygun but I just found out that the model I wanted doesn't work with latex paint. My new projector arrived yesterday. An Optoma GT750 replacing my Optoma HD20. Awesome picture on a gray wall. Now I can order my 120" 21:9 screen to replace my 100" 16:9 screen.
Any brand and model sprayer that says it's HVLP or LVLP will work with latex paint if it is thinned.

I had a look at my spraygun, they are just for spraying models, The compressor is only 1bar 10 l/min and my spraygun has 0.5, 0.7 and 1.1mm nozzles. The 1.1mm only sprays an area with 50mm diameter, could be quite tiring spraying a 120" screen.
That sounds like what we call an airbrush or perhaps a detail gun. Yeah, it would take you a LONG time to spray a projection screen with one of those.

Will the screen still be flexible/strechable after beeing painted so I can then mount it onto the frame? Or would the paint rip?
In theory the paint should stretch a bit before tearing, but this is something I have not tried so I can't really say. Just to be safe I would mount and stretch the screen material to the frame and then spray it.

How much paint do I need for a 120" 21:9 screen?
The Auto Air Aluminum is only 20% of the mix which leaves 80% regular latex paint. The coverage of the paint should be listed on the latex paint container. That said, I always like to have 1 fluid ounce of screen mix for every square foot of screen surface to be painted just to be safe. It's better to have too much than too little; especially when rolling - if you try to "stretch" the mix and put it on too thin or roll it too much you can get texture differences from one area of the screen to another which will show up during viewing.
 

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Today I did some testing with my screen sample and the Black Widow Base. I don't have the AAA yet, but I don't think there will be much difference.

So here is the texture of the screen:



I only had a small sample of the screen, a tiny airbrush gun and only the beige latex. But it was enough for a successful test. I thinned the paint by 100% because I wasn't sure if my airbrush could handle the latex. Many here complained about not beeing able to spray latex. I contacted Wagner and they said not every spraygun is capable of spraying latex. Only 4 of their models work with latex. I will get one of those when spraying the big screen (maybe next week).

After some tests I knew how to get it right. You have to use very thin paint and low pressure and apply at least 5 thin coats. I added another two to be sure, but 5 might have been enough. The holes did not plug. If you put the screen on a paper you can not tell if it is painted or not from the back. Only when you hold it up against a light the painted one is darker. Therefore I think the holes must have gotten a little thinner. But I can't hear any difference in sound if I place a painted and unpainted screen infront of my speaker. Mybe it is measurable, but I can't hear any difference.



left beige - right white




I'll keep you updated on my finished screen.
 

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Thanks for keeping us up-to-date on your progress and experimentation. :T

We do NOT recommend any non-HVLP Wagner models be used to paint screens. Their models that say they can use latex paints have large nozzles and really throw the paint! I got one of these (sorry, I forget the name and model number) and it is designed for painting the side of a house or a similar target. The resulting surface is not very smooth. As you have already found, the answer to spraying latex paint for a screen is to thin the mix with water until it sprays properly out of your gun. For the HVLP guns I have used that is around 30%, but you could safely go up to 50%. Thinning 100% with water could work, but it depends on the chemistry of the individual paint you are using; there is a point where the latex paint will start to "come apart" (for lack of a better term) and some of the constituents of the paint may begin to separate out which may or may not want to go back into solution just by shaking the container.
 

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Thanks for the info! Hm maybe I'll try the Wagner W550 instead of the Wall Perfect W665 then. But the W665 says "0–130 g/min" so I think I should be able to controll how much paint it sprays? Would you still not recommend it? Difficult..
 

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Thanks for the info! Hm maybe I'll try the Wagner W550 instead of the Wall Perfect W665 then. But the W665 says "0–130 g/min" so I think I should be able to controll how much paint it sprays? Would you still not recommend it? Difficult..
If I remember right the W550 is the European version of the original Wagner CS HVLP Control Spray unit. This sprayer was truly HVLP and produced a fine paint mist. Mech (one of the founding members of this DIY Screen forum) still has one of these. In the U.S. this model has been replaced by the Wagner Control Spray DD which uses a larger nozzle and produces a bit more spraying pressure. I know the W550 will spray a good screen.

The W665 looks to be the better unit from a usability standpoint, so it might be the better choice for general use around the home. It is a turbine unit that has separate housings for the turbine and the paint head, which is usually desirable. My main hesitation about recommending the W665 for spraying a screen is that it is actually stated as being able to spray latex paint that has been diluted only 10% - that is thick paint and I worry that the nozzle is overly large. One of the user reviews mentioned that as well and the fact that everything in the room was covered in paint and not just the garage wall they were spraying. Now this could simply be due to the user not adjusting the sprayer correctly or it could mean that the W665 has too large a tip and is too powerful to spray a fine mist. I just don't know. :dontknow: While I don't see the term "HVLP" in the advertisements for the W665 the video I saw of it on YouTube does call it an HVLP sprayer.

If you are buying or renting the sprayer just to make your screen I think I would use the W550. If you intend on using the sprayer for other paint jobs around the house then the W665 looks better, but might produce a more textured screen and produce more over-spray while painting.
 
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