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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
lcaillo, THANK YOU for all the great and courteous information.

Looking at many of the posts here, I believe my Pioneer SD-643HD5 needs new Convergence IC chips. I would like to purchase the Hitachi kits you mention in your "CRT based RPTV Convergence Repairs" thread. However, I cannot locate the chassis # on my set. If I'm reading your post right, chassis #'s have DPXXX. I cannot find any numbers that begin with DP. The serial # sticker only has the S/N, model, and the following: KUXC/CA1. The back panel also has ANC2339 printed on the corner of the panel. There are no stickers or placards inside the cabinet. Can you please help me locate the chassis #?

Also, my IC's are STK392-180. The parts distributor I called said my set is supposed to have -110's in it. Your thoughts?

Thank you in advance for your help...
 

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Re: Convergence IC equivalents

Please do not duplicate your posts. Your duplicate was deleted.

Your set is a Pioneer. The kits listed by chassis number are for Hitachi sets only. You can use the chips from them in some other sets, but the kits are specific to Hitachi. I do not recall which IC your model had specified in the original production, but Pioneer moved to replacing all STK392-110 chips with the -180 at some point. If your set was serviced, or if it had the change in production, it is the apropriate part. What parts distributor did you talk to?

I have used the STK394-160 from the Hitachi kits in Pioneer models, but they are getting hard to find. I would just replace them with the -180 from a quality supplier like Acme or B&D. Be sure to follow the information in the convergence repair sticky and checkthe resistors and fuses.

Also, you should be aware that Pioneer sets are notorious for bad solder connections throughout, and simply moving boards around can break a weak joint. Your immediate problem may relate to that as well. We rarely service them that we don't start with resoldering hundreds of connections before bothering to troubleshoot them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Re: Convergence IC equivalents

Sorry for the duplicate post. After posting the first one, I thought it would be appropriate to start e new one...

As for the kits, I misunderstood. I thought Hitachi made kits for other brands as well...

I was going to buy from Andrews since they are local but they list it as being manufactured by Panasonic. What's your take??

Some of the online retailers you recommend sell the 180's made by Sanyo while others have Pioneer. Would either one work for my Pioneer set?

Thanks for your help...
 

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All of the STK series chips were made by Sanyo, but have been counterfeited and perhaps some second rate parts have been distributed. You are pretty safe buying the parts under a TV manufacturer's part number, but you will likely pay more than buying it directly from someone like ACME or B&D. Andrews is a very good, reputable supplier and is one of the few that I recommend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I hope you all had a wonderful Thanksgiving...

Before I go any further, I would like to confirm that my problem is in fact most likely caused by a bad convergence IC. Here are some pix...








If the problem is in fact the convergence IC's, I have two options: Purchase the two IC's for $50/ea plus all the materials including resistors, multimeter, a soldering iron, solder, wick, etc for a total of about $175. Or I can buy the entire convergence assembly from Pioneer for $288. Now, I have never soldered any electronics before but I'm confident I can do it successfully. If I buy the entire assembly, I wouldn't have to worry about testing the resistors or bridging any connections by accident.

Your thoughts?
 

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You should be able to find convergence ICs for less than half that price from the very best vendors.

I rarely recommend replacing boards. The cost of the tools needes should not be so high. There are often problems associated with doing so that you don't anticipate. These are rather routine repairs. If you get a new board from Pioneer you will still need to resolder dozens of connections to be confident that it is reliable. I would recommend changing the chip and testing all related resistors. Be sure to resolder any connections with ring cracks, but be careful not to create any bridges between joints that don't belong.
 

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There is no way to be sure other than to buy them from a reliable source.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You should be able to find convergence ICs for less than half that price from the very best vendors.
Can you help me find them for that much? Looking on the vendor's websites you recommend, these are the prices I found:

Encompass - $46 (Pioneer
Encompass - $25 (Japanese Semi's)
Andrew's - $51
Acme - Not available
B&D - $60
PacParts - $46
Electonica - $40 (Lowest Price I found...)

Of course I found them for $25 on eBay where they claim they are "Genuine Sanyo" but there is no way of trusting them...

Thanks again for all your help...
 

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You checked the places that I would. I have not bought these in a while and they appear to have gone up. Electronica in CO is a very good vendor, but make sure it is not Electronix. I would get them from Electronica if they have the best price.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I would recommend changing the chip and testing all related resistors.
If anyone is familiar with this TV, would you be able to tell me which resistors I should check? All of them? Might as well, right?

Like I stated, I've never soldered before but I'm confident I can do it. What type of solder should I use? I see rosin core, clear flux, silver-bearing, lead-free, etc.

Thanks again...
 

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I have had great luck for years with Union Electronics near Chicago. They have very good prices on the STK 392-180s, with good price breaks for quantity if you are a servicer, like Len and me. I have yet to have any problems with any parts Union has sent me. The 180s are a less expensive upgrade from the 110s than the 364-160s, and are readily available at all times. I have been using the 180s for years to replace the now-primitive 110s, with no problems.

I work directly with Melissa. If you go there, tell her I sentcha -

Len, try them out and let me know how you fare -

:T

Mr Bob
 

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I have dealt with Union before. They are a good distributor, but they don't participate in any of the tech groups that I belong to and I have not had specific discussions with them about the sourcing of their STK parts. Even good didstributors have been fooled in the past and had bad ones. The reasons that I suggest Acme, and B&D to most users here is that I know that they go to extra efforts to be sure that they are not getting seconds or counterfeit parts. I simply don't have enough history with Union on the matter to be as certain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Has anyone done business with "zulfikar2000" on eBay. He aparently has a repair shop in Seminole, Florida under the name "Charlie's TV & Electronics." He swears and guarantees his parts are Genuine Sanyo but he sells his -180 IC's for $10. Is that possible that they are genuine parts for only $10?
 

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Not likely since all the known trustworthy vendors are much more expensive. Even when hey were cheap none of the good vendors had them that cheap.

Like I have said before, even some of the most professional vendors have been burned on these chips. The likelihood of some guy in a repair shop getting them that cheap and getting first quality original parts seems remote.

Just buy your parts from a recommended vendor. We have done this drill so many times that it is really old.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Well, I ended up ordering my IC's from Sears, good price, no shipping cost, and a trusted source. They were drop shipped directly from Pioneer so I would assume they are the real thing... One question though, I read a post somewhere that IC's have a serial on the back (side toward heat sink) that can be tracked. These chips I got don't have anything on the back. Is it true that they are supposed to have a serial #?

Now comes the fun part of trying to fix the set... Thanks for all the help... I WAS trying to use my convergence problem as an excuse to buy a new LCD TV but I figured I'll keep the $2500 in the bank and fix this one for a $150... Plus, I like the challenge of fixing something myself and this Pioneer fits PERFECTLY in my media nich. Totally looks like it's custom build around it. Funny story actually that I would like to share. This house was a new construction tract. I came in during construction and took some measurements to make sure the TV will fit in the nich. I measured and calculated that I would have 1" to spare. Well, move-in day comes by and I bring the TV in. It BARELY scraped in. As a matter of fact, I had to remove the base boards for the set to slid in the nich. I'm not exaggerating. If the TV was 1/32" wider, it would not have fit. Check out the picture... THE PROBLEM??? I had my head up my tail when I was measuring during construction. I measured the framing, BEFORE THEY INSTALLED THE DRYWALL.... lol

 

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You heard wrong. There should be NO printing on the back. If there is it is either a very very early production chip or a copy.

We all make mistakes like that. Sort of like forgetting to put the shrink wrap tubing on before soldering...
 
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