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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, part of my Popcorn Hour A100 review was to compare the power consumption, and ensuing cost of operation, for the A100 vs a HTPC. So, I got my hands on a Kill-A-Watt and this is what I found...

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(Item: Power Draw in watts)
Popcorn Hour (Standby/Off): 5
Popcorn Hour (Playing 1080p off network): 6
Popcorn Hour (Playing 1080p off Hard Drive): 15

HTPC (Idle): 86
HTPC (100% CPU): 105
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While I was at it, I measured the rest of my Home Theater...

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51" CRT RPTV (Movie Playing): 142
DVD Player (Movie Playing): 10
AVR (Movie Playing): 60
Sub (Movie Playing): 12
BFD (ON): 4
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So, I took my average cost-per-kilowatt (what it would cost to run a 1000 watt device for an hour), including all taxes and delivery charges, and this is what I came up with...

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My average cost over last year per kilowatt: 16.3 Cents

HERE'S THE GOOD PART...

Running an HTPC 24/7 versus running the Popcorn Hour 24/7 per year: $122.80 vs $7.14

To leave my BFD plugged in and on 24/7 costs me per year: $5.71


Watching a 2 hour movie on my HT system, in the dark, using the DVD player: $0.07
Watching Sweeny Todd in a Portland theater with 3 other people at 4pm on a Saturday: $40.00

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Hey, this is fun. I will add more items as I measure them.
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Equipment that still use power when "Off"
Subwoofer on "standby": 8
DVD "Off"/Standby: 4
Powered Speakers (Audioengine A2, no input): 3

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Other items...
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10' strand of Rope Lights: 72

Computer clocked at 1.2GHz
Idle: 86
100% CPU: 105

Same Computer Clocked at 2.7GHz
Idle: 89
100% CPU: 129

22" LCD Monitor (Light Blue Background): 36
Cable Modem: 7
Router: 4

Toaster Oven: 1190
Cost to pop a bag of Popcorn (3 minutes in 1350W microwave): 1 Cent


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To figure out your yearly cost, multiply (the wattage) x (Cents per KWH) x (
0.0876) = Cost in Dollars
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To figure out your hourly cost, multiply (the wattage) x (Cents per KWH) x (
0.001) = Cost in cents
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Other Devices:
42" LCD = 120w
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You probably should leave your sub on, it seems to use more power when its off :)

Hakka.

Fixed it, should have been 12, not two.

I think another way to look at all of this is, let's say you'd like to buy a new power strip with sequenced switching versus keeping your BFD, SUB, and DVD player on all the time. You could probably save $10 a year on electricity. Not a whole lot, but figure you're going to have that power strip for 5 or 10 years, and all of a sudden, you just saved $100. It's enough to make you want to go out a buy a new power strip.

I like this one: http://www.tripplite.com/products/product.cfm?productID=3500 :)
 

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Wow, very interesting? Much less wattage on the theater than I assumed. What that averaged over a time period of peaks and low level volumes?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I put the movie on a scene with lots of sound coming out of all the speakers, set the level to normal listening, and averaged the wattage of all the equipment. The TV also fluctuated from light to dark scenes, so once again, I just averaged it.

Admittedly, my setup probably isn't running as high as others. I have pretty basic equipment, and, thanks to shared walls, am running far below 85db, so your results, if you're really cooking, might be double mine.

The biggest thing is to find those pieces of equipment that use energy even when they're "off".
 

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Yeah, i've got 2 subs that stay on standby, plus both my fronts and center are powered and probably draw some power even when off... I am curious to know how much they constantly are drawing out.
 

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Quote:
eugovector wrote:
"For the record, my Onkyo 706 with no signal fed (thus, no power output, but amps are still on), used about 65 watts."

I just got my meter last night.
I'm measuring mine exactly like yours. Onkyo 706 with no signal fed, pre-outs used for front 3 channels to outboard amp, outboard amp is OFF at this time ...

Straight off without warming up, my 706 measured 75watts, but steadily climbed.
Right now, after 20min. of warming up and being measured, it is at 104watts and still climbing, don't know where it will stop (this is still with no signal fed).

My ATI 6ch. amp measured 127watts with no signal fed to it.

UPDATE After 40min. the Onkyo seems to have leveled off at 111watts. Now to start feeding it a signal and adjusting the volume control.
Still with no signal feed: with volume at -80db, 111watts... volume at +7db, 115watts.

UPDATE Adding a signal feed but outboard amp still off: with volume at -80db, 108watts... volume at +7db, 110watts.
 

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Actually this is one of the biggest up and coming things in the industry right now and I took a seminar at EHX yesterday about new opportunities in Energy Management. We will soon start seeing more and more options to kill the vampire power consumption. A few power conditioners are even able to turn off individual outlets and some companies are working controllable outlets to be installed in place of standard outlets, in a more consumer friendly fashion. We have been able to do this for years and years via optional products for crestron, AMX and such but it will be much easier and discrete now.
 

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hmm good question I just moved a ton of a/v & computer stuff from one house to another, once the first month is over I will get to see the electric bill's from both and then i'll know the truth which I suspect is 90% of my bill o'well the toy's cost money I guess.....
 
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