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Discussion Starter #1
This seems out of the ordinary I'm sure, but I have an interesting question that I need help answering.

I currently have my home theatre equipment set up in my room, and since the room is small and usually has the door closed (as not to disturb others), it can get quite warm (like 80+ degrees warm). While my house has central air, it's just not cutting it, so I have opted to get a window Air Conditioner for when it becomes unbearably hot.

So the problem posed is actually a 2 parter:

1. I don't want the AC unit to come on and cause a drop in power for the actual AV equipment, any suggestions as how to combat that? I was thinking a power filter might do the job.

2. I'm deathly afraid that every time the unit comes on my circuit breaker (15 amps) will trip, since my AV equipment is probably puling a decent amount of power, and the AC unit says it needs 4.6 amps to run.

Any ideas or suggestions?
Thanks in advance
 

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Any ideas or suggestions?
If your house have three phase power, install ac to other phase that av stuff. Bit extra work to install new line from fuse panel, but should be still cheaper and better solution than power conditioner/filter.
 

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I agree that running a new dedicated circuit for the A/V equipment would be your best choice. Run the A/C unit on the circuit your using now for the audio unless its already dedicated.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the suggestion. After scouring around the net a bit more it seems that this is what most people do for their AV stuff anyways. I'll have to get a quote from an electrician before I do anything. Is there anything specific I should ask them when they come to look? Like a specific amperage, type of receptacles, etc. If I am going to have it done, I want it done correctly.

Thanks for the info so far. Also this won't guarantee perfectly clean power correct?
 

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Well for the cost running two dedicated circuits should be considered. All the electrician needs to do is get 14/3 wire meaning two hots and one neutral with a ground and an extra 15amp breaker.
No, for perfectly clean power I would consider one of these.
 

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Completely depends on the power needs of your theater equipment. What do you have, and what do you want to get (always leave room for upgrades)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Currently, I have a Denon 4310ci 7.1 channel Receiver, and a Dayton 1000 Sub Amp. My "TV" is just a 24" Samsung monitor, and I have a really beefed up computer hooked up to it all. The peak amperage for everything would just pass about 11 amps, leaving only 4 for other things.
 

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The peak amperage for everything would just pass about 11 amps, leaving only 4 for other things.
Incorrect, If your drawing 11 amps you have only 1 amp to spare. Anything more then 12 amps on a 15 amp circuit will trip it after about 30 min.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Good to know. Then even more reason to have a dedicated line ran. I guess I can be non specific in telling the electrician what I want then? Just tell him to dedicate a line for 15 or 20 amps up to the area of my desire? Or should I be more specific?
 

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Just tell him/her that you want "2 dedicated 15 amp circuits using 14/3 in a 4 plex plugin" if he does not know what that means then you should find someone who is qualified to do the work as that is a standard.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Sounds reasonable. I'll be sure to ask exactly that. Thanks for the help thus far. I'll be making the call tomorrow, so I'll report back if I need any more help.
 

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tonyvdb said:
Just tell him/her that you want "2 dedicated 15 amp circuits using 14/3 in a 4 plex plugin" if he does not know what that means then you should find someone who is qualified to do the work as that is a standard.
Excellent advice from tonyvdb (as usual). When you reconnect your equipment I would suggest putting a/c on existing circuit, sub amp on 1 new circuit, and AVR on new circuit with sources.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Sounds like a solid plan. I'm noticing that due to the layout of the room, one of the rear channels will have to brave the power cable for the AC unit. Do you think this will create noise on that channel?
 

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can you not hide the power cable under carpet or along the baseboards of a wall?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I can probably shove the cable under the baseboard... would that be distanced enough? The speaker cable will quite literally pass right underneath the outlet for the AC.
 

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yes that would be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Sweet deal. I'll do that then. Thanks for the continued support guys. I appreciate it. I'll keep you posted on my progress, etc.
 

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It’s doubtful you really need two dedicated circuits, but it probably won’t cost much more than a single one, so no harm.

However, I doubt the electrician can use 12-3 or 14-3 for that. Typically this wire is used for carrying 220 volt circuits, as might be used for an electric stove or something like that. 220 volt circuits have two 110 volt hot legs (typically sent on the black and red wires), but only a single common or return wire (the white one). Normally this is “doable” because of the alternating current duty cycle: The two 110 volt hot legs are on opposing phases, which means one of them will be swinging on the positive side, while the other is swinging to the negative side at any given moment. The single neutral wire is “on duty” full-time, alternately being the return for one hot leg or the other.

The problem we have with a home theater set up is that all circuits should be on the same service phase, to help avoid ground loops. Sending two hot legs through a 12-3 or 14-3 romex that are on the same phase means the common wire is seeing twice the load that the two hot leg wires are. So basically, for dual circuits on the same phase, two separate runs of romex are required.

Of course, your electrician will know these things, but at least you’ll know why he doesn’t use 12-3 or 14-3 if you get two circuits installed. He’s not just trying to hit you with an extra materials cost. :)


Is there anything specific I should ask them when they come to look? Like a specific amperage, type of receptacles, etc. If I am going to have it done, I want it done correctly.
Not required, but it ‘s never a bad idea to request heavy-duty specification-grade outlet devices. They will cost a few dollars each, while typical builder’s grade outlets are often under a buck. Spec-grade outlets can better withstand high long-term loads. That might be more of an advantage for your window A/C unit than your HT gear, but it’s only a few extra dollars. Another benefit of upgraded outlets is that they that grip the plugs tighter, which reduces resistance and better insures less voltage drop and therefore full power for amplifier demands.

Regards,
Wayne
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for such a large amount of info. I'll definitely keep it in mind when the electrician is here today.

I also spoke with him on the phone yesterday, and after hearing what I have planned he suggested two 20 amp circuits. And possibly a third for the AC.
 
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