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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have a QSC DSP30?

I've seen it mentioned at the Seaton Sound forums, and was just curious about how good it was.

I imagine the limiting factor with a miniDSP is processing power, and plugin options. I'm not calling the miniDSP limited. Big difference between $100-150 and $750.

I figure the DSP30 is a fully fledged DSP solution that's more flexible.
 

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Well, the biggest difference is most likely the number of outputs, i know the minidsp is fairly low with 4 outputs, and i would expect a pro-sound piece to have 6 or more outputs. The minidsp is computer programmable, which i bet the QSC is as well, but being made in 2005, its going to have a more dated interface, and possible need an rs232 vs usb input.

The MiniDSP doesnt have an interface that you can work with while things are running. This is a big difference as well.

I'd buy a Behringer DCX 2496, its in the mid price range, has a great interface, and more power than the minidsp, Just run it with digital inputs, and its cleaner than most units on the market. In fact, a DCX2496, and a DEQ2496 would run you under the price of the QSC, and you'd have an RTA, the conversion to AES for digital input, and one of the better equalizers on the market.

Pro sound is a blessing and a curse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The DSP-30 has 2 inputs and 2 outputs. It has a serial input too.

For the speakers I'm working on - I'm planning on going the MiniDSP route. While I have nothing against the DCXs, I think the MiniDSP is a better fit.

I was just curious where the DSP-30 fit, since it seems like when it came out - it was a pretty high end DSP.

Looks like the DSP design software is pretty robust.
 

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Looks to me like its flexibility is pretty limited. Since it has only a single set of outputs about all it’s good for is equalizing or high or low pass filtering. As you can see on P. 21 of the manual, a bi- or tri-amped system would require multiple units. Probably any of the Driverack components would be a better option for a speaker processor / electronic crossover, unless you can pick up the DSP30 dirt-cheap used.

Regards,
Wayne
 

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Just surprised me that it's $740 (new) for a 6 yr old DSP.
Well, you have to keep in mind that you’re not just getting the processing power for that price. You’re also getting a steel-chassis component that’s built like a tank. I mean, look at the weight of the thing – 9.5 lbs. Naturally that’s not as important in a home theater application as it is in a touring PA system, where gear gets bounced around from gig to gig in the back of a big truck. So for a home theater application, you’re paying for a heavy-duty construction that you don’t really need, which makes it not such a great deal for most of us.

Regards,
Wayne
 

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Considering that’d you’d need at least two DSP30s for most home theater installations - If you can live with 24 dB/octave Butterworth high, low or bandpass pass filters between 20 Hz – 20 kHz, and don’t need the DSP30’s limiting and compression features, a pair of Yamaha YDP-2006 digital parametric EQs will do what a pair of DSP30s can for a fraction of the cost ($2-300 for a pair of Yamahas vs. $1400 for a pair of DSP30s).

Regards,
Wayne
 
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