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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm ready to size my sub enclosure but have questions about damping material.

Should I install the damping material on all internal surfaces or just the top?

Is there any one type of material considered better than another? What thickness should I use?

Is the volume occupied by the damping material a consideration when sizing the enclosure?

Thanks in advance.

John
 

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Elite Shackster
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7,142 Posts
I would ask why you feel the need to use any damping at all. I would only even consider it with a ported sub that wasnt using any wadding inside myself.
 

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Build your enclosure so it passes the "knuckle rap test" and you really don't need any damping material. If you do use something like acoustic foam, it can increase the effective size of the enclosure by a couple percentage points.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have perhaps misused the term damping.

I was refering to the material that member Iglura used in this build. On page 4 post # 8 he states the following:

"This is the complete port-tube with top plates and damping."

Are you telling me that this "insulation" is not necessary? I have read other post refering to some sort of foam insulation and even fiberglass.

I'm just trying to make my enclosure as good as it can possibly be.

Thanks for your input.

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Build your enclosure so it passes the "knuckle rap test" and you really don't need any damping material. If you do use something like acoustic foam, it can increase the effective size of the enclosure by a couple percentage points.
I'm not familiar with the "knuckle rap test" ?

Can you describe it or direct me to a discussion?

Thanks,

John
 

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Elite Shackster
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Are you telling me that this "insulation" is not necessary?

John
This entirely depends on the design of your particular build. In most cases its not necessary to use damping material. Acoustic wadding is different and its use is much more common, again your design will be dependant on its use.

I'm not familiar with the "knuckle rap test" ?

Can you describe it or direct me to a discussion?

Thanks,

John
If you build your box solid enough, a quick tap on th sides with your knuckle should be met with a dead knock sound thats pretty dull, signifying a rock solid construction. Any half decently built box will pass this test no problem.

If you need to get into it a bit more, some background info on your design idea will help give us an idea of what you have in mind and what damping or acoustic foam might be ideal for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This entirely depends on the design of your particular build. In most cases its not necessary to use damping material. Acoustic wadding is different and its use is much more common, again your design will be dependant on its use.

If you build your box solid enough, a quick tap on th sides with your knuckle should be met with a dead knock sound thats pretty dull, signifying a rock solid construction. Any half decently built box will pass this test no problem.

If you need to get into it a bit more, some background info on your design idea will help give us an idea of what you have in mind and what damping or acoustic foam might be ideal for you.
Moonfly,

Here's my plan at this point



and



I'm making it slightly bigger than Mike's recommendation because the driver volume parameter is slightly off in the program.

Does this look like a viable design?

Thanks for looking,

John
 
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