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I am in the midst of painting my subwoofer in black lacquer and am running in some issues...

1. When I sprayed the lacquer over the Kilz/Zinsser primer, the paint cracked. I used the odorless primer (I assume it is water-based), is that why? I had the primer dry for a couple of days before spraying the lacquer...

2. I found out you never dry-sand lacquer. Even wet-sanding causes the paper to clog and the clogged paint gouges out the finish. How do you avoid that? I tried scraping the clogged material from the paper but it is awfully difficult.

3. How long after applying the clear coat do you wait before you start polishing it? I did it after a week and the clear coat clouded up when I started to buff it out.

4. I tried using Bondo to patch the gouges but it literally dissolved the lacquer. What should I use to patch the gouges?

:help:
 

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Piano black lacquer is not a plug and play kind of finish. The reason places charge so much for it. It is part science and part art. Not your typical home finish. It is more of an automotive kind of finish. You're already learning you can't just shoot anything and it will work. Water base, oil base and lacquer are all different. You really can't mix them. Lacquer also takes a long time to air dry. That is why automotive shops use heat to bake the finish. When I did my speakers I had about 12 coats and it took around four months for it to dry. What is dry to the touch is not fully cured. Until then it is very soft and yes it will clog sand paper really fast. You have to clean the paper or keep replacing it. Do not use a lot of pressure. A light touch goes a long way here. Lacquer also shrinks as it dries. To polish you will need a high speed buffer and a wool pad. Lacquer requires heat to blend and get you the wet look. The high speed buffer generates that heat, but you have to be careful not to burn the finish. Again, part art, as you need just the right touch to master.
 
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