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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi,
So I know that you can kill a sub with low frequencies. I'm unsure about how long it takes to heat up the coils to that point (I don't want to learn it from experience) and is there anything else that worth to keep an eye on in a normal use case?
I don't listen to trap base,192.168.8.1 - Admin Login 192.168.100.1 - 192.168.l00.1 Admin Login 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.O.1 Login admin I mostly use my subs for home theater. And I'm not having the Edge of Tomorrow opening on repeat so I think I'm safe, but I'd like to know a bit more about the topic.
Thanks!
 

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Nothing your sub can do will harm the sub... unless you are foolish and play it much too loudly. There's nothing wrong with "low frequencies" as long as you aren't stressing the amplifier.
 

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Da Wiz is correct, very low frequencies will not harm a subwoofer. But playing a sub too loudly will definitely damage it! Never let your sub amp go into clipping. Worked at an audio store / speaker recone shop for several years. Vast majority of blown woofers are caused by amplifiers that were driven into clipping. When a blown woofer has its cone removed, exposing the voice coil, the voice coil will show burn marks from the amplifier that drove it into clipping.

No red lights on sub amp!
 

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That's what subsonic (highpass) filters are for to prevent over excursion.
 

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Hi,
So I know that you can kill a sub with low frequencies. I'm unsure about how long it takes to heat up the coils to that point (I don't want to learn it from experience) and is there anything else that worth to keep an eye on in a normal use case?
I don't listen to trap base, I mostly use my subs for home theater. And I'm not having the Edge of Tomorrow opening on repeat so I think I'm safe, but I'd like to know a bit more about the topic.
Thanks!
If you want serious low bass single digit you need a Tactile Transducer or two , I installed two in my couch to the springs . If you haven't tried it dont knock it. subs are good for bass yes but a transducer will give you the feel your craving. its a magnetic coil with a metal weight inside the coil that moves the weight when energized powered by a dedicated house amp, these are so underrated , Ive tried bolting to frame but to the springs its a little different, I also have dual pb16 SVS , no shortage of bass here , I have low volume bass , I can have a conversation with someone and not get blown away with output and have impacting bass , its unfreaking real. there not that expensive either compared to a sub, and in an apartment its great your not going to **** your neighbors off.
 

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DC can kill your sub. That and over excursion.
If you are worried there are ways to protect passive devices, like adding a large, low frequency value capacitor to your signal path to the driver.

However, amps only continuously pass DC when they are defective.
 

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All true. Nickaboy, you are correct. Tactile Transducers do rock, and are fab if you live in an apartment, and need to respect the neighbors (Or your wife. Your mileage may vary...).

But subsonic filters were developed back in the days (1960's. Yep!) when EVERY one had a turntable, because, that's all there was! (except for tuners). Subsonic frequencies were all to easy to generate from many of those older turntable designs, and yes, you could over exert your woofer cones that way, causing the cones to become "stuck in the gap".

But assuming you are not using a turntable, there is nothing in a modern signal chain that should generate those kind of sub-sonics. You'll notice, very few modern amplifiers or pre-amps have a sub-sonic filter. There's just no need for such with modern DVD players, CD players, and certainly not with any streaming source.

And if you are using a turntable, let's hope it's a proper belt drive rig, with a solid heavy platter, and you have placed it not on a flimsy shelf, but on a heavy, solid piece of furniture.

But, I must take exception: amps CAN pass DC signals when they are not defective. If you feed your subwoofer amplifier with a distorted signal (not likely to happen, but just follow along for a moment please), the amp CAN pass that distorted signal (possibly containing some DC current) on to the speaker (or subwoofer) cones, causing them damage and possible failure.

Or, as most people who are about to learn an expensive lesson do, simply turn it up until the subwoofer amplifier is driven into clipping (red lights anyone?). Keep it there for several minutes, and....bye bye subwoofer cone voice coil.

Still- the best way to keep from damaging any loudspeaker, is to listen. Does it sound distorted? Turn it down some, till the distortion is gone. Not loud enough for 'ya? Get a bigger/better/cleaner system....
 
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