Home Theater Forum and Systems banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a couple of devices that already use wireless in my equipment rack and a couple that have network capabilities but no built in wireless. Unfortunately running a CAT5 line would be a lot more work than I would like to tackle in my house so the idea of a wireless bridge really appeals to me.

I was wondering if it is possible and/or advisable to run a router at the wireless bridge area to connect multiple devices (networked AVR, DirecTV Hd_DVR, AppleTV, PS3) through one bridge? My thinking is A) I already have an older wired router just sitting and collecting dust, B) I wonder is several devices in one area all working wirelessly will compete and degrade the signal, and C) I am a cheap bugger at heart so if I could get one wireless bridge as opposed to at minimum 2 (for the AVR and the DVR), well that would be great.

Thanks for any input or advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
You can do this with 2 wireless routers using something called WDS bridging. But you do have to find two that support this feature and they likely need to be between the same brand of router as the WDS bridging is not really a standard.

I've done this with two linksys routers both running the same version of dd-wrt open source firmware for the exact same purpose as you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Miked, I may just try this. I already have a Linksys WRT52G2, and I can pick up a second, refurb unit for the same price (or less) than a wireless bridge. :thumbsup:

Have you noticed any issues with wired or wireless speeds going this route?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
You need to make sure that you can load the open source firmware because in stock form they don't function as a bridge. I had my linksys bridged to a verizon westell modem with no issues.
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wireless_Bridge
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Supported_Devices
Thanks Miked, I may just try this. I already have a Linksys WRT52G2, and I can pick up a second, refurb unit for the same price (or less) than a wireless bridge. :thumbsup:

Have you noticed any issues with wired or wireless speeds going this route?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
options as I see them

OK, to sum up what I have learned so far, I can choose any of the following three:

A) Use a wireless bridge, such as the Linksys WET610N and then use a switch to split to the AVR and DirecTV
B) Use the wireless bridge and connect to my HR23 DVR, then use its built in ethernet out port which I never realized was there to go to the AVR and leave the other two devices remain wireless through the built in wifi capabilities they have.
C) Use another router and dd-wrt to create another wireless bridge, but with multiple ports. This requires downloading different firmware onto the router.

Overall, very cool that I have so many options. I see the attraction to using a second router as my existing router would work for 1/2 of the equation but am concerned about accidentally bricking both of them (computers are not a specialty of mine). This would be a touch cheaper and give me more port options though for future growth if needed. I also like the plug and play nature of just using a WET610N and daisy chaining through the DVR. Are any of these preferable over any of the others?

Edit: Well I reviewed a few websites regarding dd-wrt, and while I am sure that most people can get this going reasonably easily, I don't trust myself all that much with this type of stuff. I just ordered a WET610N and am going to try option "B" for now. Thanks again for all the info and help, you guys rock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
You might also consider powerline networking adapters.

This is the 3rd gen model of these things and has been getting good reviews.

You plug one into a modem and on the other end you can plug in a switch with multiple ports. The advantage is that it gives you a "wired" network using your electrical system. The variable is your home wiring. If it works - simple and done. If it doesn't work, you can return them for a few bucks (unless you get them at Best Buy = no restocking fee).

If it does work in your home, it is much simpler than trying to get a bunch of wireless stuff working together. Plus, you can add other adapters / switches in other parts of the house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
God I wish I understood anything you guys are talking about....

All I know is my computer won't send anything to my printer anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
You might also consider powerline networking adapters.

This is the 3rd gen model of these things and has been getting good reviews.

You plug one into a modem and on the other end you can plug in a switch with multiple ports. The advantage is that it gives you a "wired" network using your electrical system. The variable is your home wiring. If it works - simple and done. If it doesn't work, you can return them for a few bucks (unless you get them at Best Buy = no restocking fee).

If it does work in your home, it is much simpler than trying to get a bunch of wireless stuff working together. Plus, you can add other adapters / switches in other parts of the house.
I use these in the basement for the PS3 and it works great. The router is on the second floor, so a true wired option was too much hassle and the wireless option was always a shaky connection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
God I wish I understood anything you guys are talking about....

All I know is my computer won't send anything to my printer anymore.
One of the things you might try is to do the steps to delete your printer & driver (a search on the internet will yield some good direction based on your setup/operating system) and reinstall it. That generally does the trick.

A more extreme choice would be to move to Windows 7 and do a clean install. I have been using it for about three weeks and it is a great improvement on both XP and Vista so far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
One of the things you might try is to do the steps to delete your printer & driver (a search on the internet will yield some good direction based on your setup/operating system) and reinstall it. That generally does the trick.

A more extreme choice would be to move to Windows 7 and do a clean install. I have been using it for about three weeks and it is a great improvement on both XP and Vista so far.
I think its with the main computers network software Ray. I can have the WRT54G2 wireless router powered up which the printer is connected through (no parallel) and my laptop will print fine. Use the main computer and no go. EasyLink Advisor won't come up either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
OK, to sum up what I have learned so far, I can choose any of the following three:

A) Use a wireless bridge, such as the Linksys WET610N and then use a switch to split to the AVR and DirecTV
B) Use the wireless bridge and connect to my HR23 DVR, then use its built in ethernet out port which I never realized was there to go to the AVR and leave the other two devices remain wireless through the built in wifi capabilities they have.
C) Use another router and dd-wrt to create another wireless bridge, but with multiple ports. This requires downloading different firmware onto the router.

Overall, very cool that I have so many options. I see the attraction to using a second router as my existing router would work for 1/2 of the equation but am concerned about accidentally bricking both of them (computers are not a specialty of mine). This would be a touch cheaper and give me more port options though for future growth if needed. I also like the plug and play nature of just using a WET610N and daisy chaining through the DVR. Are any of these preferable over any of the others?

Edit: Well I reviewed a few websites regarding dd-wrt, and while I am sure that most people can get this going reasonably easily, I don't trust myself all that much with this type of stuff. I just ordered a WET610N and am going to try option "B" for now. Thanks again for all the info and help, you guys rock.
Hi Nick,
Did you end up getting this bridge? I just bought a Sony BDP-N460 (blu-ray player), and they recommend this exact bridge you were talking about. I didn't like it because it seems to only have one port and I am wanting to connect my HDDVR to the internet finally. I have had DirectTV for years and I never got it connected online, so it will be nice to take advantage of the DirectTv on demand.
I really don't understand a lot of this either, but it seems like option B may work for my set up. I just need to connect the blu-ray player and the DVR to the bridge to get on the internet.
Actually I am glad I read this because I thought I needed a bridge with multiple ports to make this work. Seems like I can sort of 'daisy chain' this if need be. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Ray
jeez this is so tempting and would solve a huge growing problem in my game room with the growing number of electronics I am adding that want internet connectivity.
Right now this and a 4 port switch would work. None of the devices need full time data transfer just periodic ( dvr and firmware call ins).
Do you think this set up will buy me a few (5) year's before I have to get the house completely retrofitted with Cat 6?
Did you have any problem with the swtich connecting to the powerline adapter?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
It's just a simple solution (think USB hub) that allows you to plug in more "stuff".

As far as how long - who knows? Even with CAT 6 in the walls, it's likely you would need some type of switch/hub anyhow.

I bought 8 port Linksys hubs originally. If more ports are needed, another switch can be added to the mix.

Ultimately, I returned the powerline adapters in favor of hardwiring with CAT6, but the switch worked anyhow.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top