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Discussion Starter #1
Hi!

I'm a first time user of REW, and I have a question where I don't really get the documentation:

When calibrating sound card, what is actually measured? Frequency, latency, absolute level?

The reason for my question is that with the equipment I have at hand, with a Behringer ECM8000 conncted to a Zoom H4m which is acting both sound card (in and out) as well as mic pre-amp, I have no line level input. Will this work with this calibration or should I skip it?
 

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Most sound cards in that price range are of sufficient quality that they don’t need a calibration file. However, since this device has built-in mics, it may have its own response curve added to render the output flat – i.e. compensating for the mic’s inadequacies. I don‘t think I’d trust this one for REW if you can’t generate a sound card calibration.

Regards,
Wayne
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Most sound cards in that price range are of sufficient quality that they don’t need a calibration file. However, since this device has built-in mics, it may have its own response curve added to render the output flat – i.e. compensating for the mic’s inadequacies. I don‘t think I’d trust this one for REW if you can’t generate a sound card calibration.

Regards,
Wayne
I'm not planning to use the Zooms own mic's for the calibration, I'm using the Beheringer ECM8000. The Zoom is in this case just acting mic pre and sound card. I don't think the Zoom will try to "compensate" anything from it's XLR inputs?
 

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The calibration has two purposes, providing frequency response compensation and checking that monitoring is not active anywhere in the path, as it is much easier to spot that on a loopback connection. H4n seems to have combination XLR/phone connectors, so a loopback could be done on that, maybe H4m doesn't have that? You can go ahead without calibrating the soundcard, but make sure there is no monitoring and that the low cut filter is turned off.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The calibration has two purposes, providing frequency response compensation and checking that monitoring is not active anywhere in the path, as it is much easier to spot that on a loopback connection. H4n seems to have combination XLR/phone connectors, so a loopback could be done on that, maybe H4m doesn't have that? You can go ahead without calibrating the soundcard, but make sure there is no monitoring and that the low cut filter is turned off.
Sorry, it is a H4n :)

Thanks.
 

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I'm not planning to use the Zooms own mic's for the calibration, I'm using the Beheringer ECM8000.
I know you ‘re not using the Zoom’s mics. My point is that it’s the mics’ input that’s feeding to the device’s output. The mics are cheap and will not have flat response, so there’s a good chance that a correction curve is being applied to the output to compensate for the mics’ shortcomings.


The Zoom is in this case just acting mic pre and sound card. I don't think the Zoom will try to "compensate" anything from it's XLR inputs?
Sounds like you don’t know for sure, and I certainly don’t either, hence the questions. Unless you can find a schematic showing that the XLR input is straight-through, or manufacturer’s info stating the same, then there’s no way of knowing. Give John’s suggestion for generating a calibration file a try, but if it’s unsuccessful I wouldn’t trust any frequency response graphs generated by this device.

Regards,
Wayne
 
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