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The reason to reduce a peak is that the room interaction at that frequency demands it. If you have a 15dB peak at 50hz, and you introduce a filter of -15dB at 50Hz of the same bandwidth, the room will bring that frequency back level with the rest of the response. Why would you turn up the amp to compensate?

brucek
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The reason to reduce a peak is that the room interaction at that frequency demands it. If you have a 15dB peak at 50hz, and you introduce a filter of -15dB at 50Hz of the same bandwidth, the room will bring that frequency back level with the rest of the response. Why would you turn up the amp to compensate?

brucek
When a few peaks are in the frequency response curve and a few cuts are done to overcome them the overall volume is reduced thus the reason for turning up the amp to compensate for the loss, correct?
 

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No, it should make them just right. If your final, in-room frequency response measures near your target, you will be doing well. You don't want +10 dB humps -- that's degrading the experience by artifically boosting that frequency due to the room or whatever.
 
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