Home Theater Forum and Systems banner

21 - 27 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Set it on a neoprene pad but I would choose a location other than under the piano. Does it have to go on the floor? It can sit on another object if need be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
As mentioned earlier in the thread, umfortunately, I'm down to the under side of the baby grand as far as space. Once I gave up on placement behind the console (it just plain doesn't fit) I now have no other workable alternatives. But that piano is not that large; and it's very open.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I would have reservations about setting it soooo close to a resonant panel, namely, the piano soundboard. Just sayin' :) Only real way to tell is to move it there and listen/measure. I do wonder if the subwoofer will have any lasting deleterious effect on the piano. They (pianos) can be delicate and expensive to tune/fix.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Discussion Starter · #24 · (Edited)
A very good point! My hope is that the frequency response of the sound board is above that of the sub. This seems possible, especially in light if the fact that the piano is a 6 footer. But as you suggested, only way to know is to try it out. As for tuning, I have to tune it every 6 months (sometimes less) for the studio purposes anyway, so that's no big deal. And I can't think of any possible way of permanently damaging the piano with audio.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
A very good point! My hope is that the frequency response of the sound board is above that of the sub. This seems possible, especially in light if the fact that the piano is a 6 footer. But as you suggested, only way to know is to try it out. As for tuning, I have to tune it every 6 months (sometimes less) for the studio purposes anyway, so that's no big deal. And I can't think of any possible way of permanently damaging the piano with audio.
Though the passband of the piano soundboard/strings may be out of the range of the sub. However marginally, since they can both play many of the same frequencies, that, to me, is only one consideration. You may not get any string or panel excitation from harmonic coupling, there is still a vibration that is more mechanical in nature. If a painting or mirror vibrates on a wall from the bass energy in a room, it can be the mass of the painting was excited or sympathetic vibrations travelling through the higher mass of the wall. This is the primary concern I would have with the piano. As having been raised around pianos my entire life, I can assure there are many variables that can affect their performance and mechanical durability. I am only saying, in point, that I would proceed with caution. Car analogy: keep in mind all the loose nuts and bolts on your car were undone from vibration. :hsd: Cheers, mate!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
FLAudioGuy said:
I am only saying, in point, that I would proceed with caution. Car analogy: keep in mind all the loose nuts and bolts on your car were undone from vibration.
This is the reason why I drive a Toyota!

Seriously, I see your point. The piano is a 1968 George Steck. If you're familiar with pianos, you may recall this make being mostly wood parts, except the obvious hinges and pedals / pedal posts, and the string frame. I'm sure the wood is hard an meant to vibrate. I'm not sure if this means it will vibrate more or less than one with more metal in it. And for sure, the upper harmonics created by low-end sources is always there.

On the other hand, I won't be pumping earthquakes through my sub at 110 dB. I spend most of my day listening at about 60 - 65 dB (at the listening position). Time is the true test.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Good luck my friend and keep us posted on how it turns out. Cheers! :T
 
21 - 27 of 27 Posts
Top