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I've been slowly building my own DIY screen. I started with the intent to paint my wall, and had spackled in the orange peel and several coats of primer. Then my wife got involved. She wanted to paint the room too. So the project expanded. From there, I decided to build a screen that stood out from the wall, but wanted it to be a full size 4:3 too, like what I had started. Attached are a few pics.

The screen is made of 1/4" MDF laminated to a 1/2" x 3" frame on the back side. The screen is 8'x6', using a full sheet and half sheet of 1/4" MDF as the screen substrate.

The joint of the two pieces is backed by a 1/2" X 3" piece of MDF, and several supports throughout. The joint was nailed at the seem and then filled with Elmer's Wood Filler and then sanded smooth.

The screen is hung to the wall using mitered cleats - cleats screwed to the wall at each stud, and cleats screwed (carefully) and glued to the back of the screen. The is also makes it easy to remove from the wall if needed. The cleats are from old 3/4" oak ply that had been sitting in my shop for several years.

The screen is backlit using rope lights from Home Depot - about $20 for the 18' I needed - two 12' and two 2' ropes chained together.

The edges are painted flat black, and the screen primed with 3 coats of Kilz2 primer. I have the paint for Cream and Sugar, and 2" flok tape to edge the screen after painting.

Even with the Kilz2 primer, I'm quite pleased with the picture.

Included in the pictures is a shot of the mount I also machined in my shop. It is painted using a flat black paint I had used for my old grill :) - It hides well in the dark room watching movies.

When I get if painted with Cream and Sugar, I'll be calibrating using Avai II to try to get the best picture possible.

Hope this helps give some ideas...

Cheers,

Trent
 

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Welcome to the forum Trent!

Great looking screen so far! Looking forward to more photos as you complete it. :T

It would be a good idea to calibrate to the Kilz2 screen before applying the C&S.
 

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well done on a great job on joining the 2 MDF panels.:clap:
the join looks invisible in the pics. is that so when you are viewing aswell??

this should help quite a few people looking to build a large screen where the limiting factor was the size of the substrate.
 

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Why would you want to calibrate with the Kilz2 before doing the C&S? I'd think that it would be off when I did the C&S (Don't know enough about it, so plead my ignorance)
 

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The seam is invisible - in 'test' uses, I have yet to see any signs of the joint. I think the key was using enough glue to allow it to squeeze out the joint to aid in the filling of the joint and nailing it every few inches each side of the joint - and doing it on a very flat and level surface.

I did a thorough sanding of the joint before filling the nail holes and remaining cracks with Elmer's wood filler. I made sure that I filled about 2" either side of the joint, much like taping sheet rock, then sanded smooth. I was quite surprised that it came out as invisible as it is. I think another key was using the 1/4" MDF, as it is a very, stiff stable substrate.
 

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Another minor note, I placed the third cleat from the top right behind the joint, which covers the 1/2" x 3" joint backing board - this also helped when mounting to the wall to maintain a very flat joint.
 

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Trent,

Did you seal the wood at the joint? On all sides? The only reason I ask is because I would think eventually the seam would show due to expansion/contraction of wood due to humidity levels.

Welcome to the Shack! :T

mech
 

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Why would you want to calibrate with the Kilz2 before doing the C&S? I'd think that it would be off when I did the C&S (Don't know enough about it, so plead my ignorance)
You can skip the Kilz2 calibration if you want to, no big deal since it and C&S are close in shade; but doing such a calibration will get you familiar with the calibration process, assuming you've never done it before, and it would be interesting to see if there is much, if any, calibration difference between Kilz2 and C&S.
 

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I did not seal before glue up. However, I did glue the edges and allowed it to squeeze out - hoping that expansion would not be a problem. With 1 1/2" of glue surface for each side of the joint, plus glue on the edge, and nailed, I was working towards a pretty solid, tight joint.

I guess we'll see what happens over time. I've worked a lot with MDF and have rarely seen any problems with expansion.
 

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You can skip the Kilz2 calibration if you want to, no big deal since it and C&S are close in shade; but doing such a calibration will get you familiar with the calibration process, assuming you've never done it before, and it would be interesting to see if there is much, if any, calibration difference between Kilz2 and C&S.
That is a good idea. I haven't done any calibration before, so that will give me a good excuse to get the DVD out and give it a run through and get familiar with the process. :reading:
 

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I did not seal before glue up. However, I did glue the edges and allowed it to squeeze out - hoping that expansion would not be a problem. With 1 1/2" of glue surface for each side of the joint, plus glue on the edge, and nailed, I was working towards a pretty solid, tight joint.

I guess we'll see what happens over time. I've worked a lot with MDF and have rarely seen any problems with expansion.
You should see the shelves I built that have plants on them. I over watered them once. :thumbsdown:

I'd seal up the back side just to be sure with some sort of sealer. Cause you know when it gets stressed the seam will be the part that would be the issue. And primer's cheap! I always regretted not sealing up my wood frame fully while building it. :doh: I haven't had any issues... yet. But my frame is solid hardwood. :huh:

And I'd ove to see some pictures! :bigsmile:

mech
 

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You should see the shelves I built that have plants on them. I over watered them once. :thumbsdown:

I'd seal up the back side just to be sure with some sort of sealer. Cause you know when it gets stressed the seam will be the part that would be the issue. And primer's cheap! I always regretted not sealing up my wood frame fully while building it. :doh: I haven't had any issues... yet. But my frame is solid hardwood. :huh:

And I'd ove to see some pictures! :bigsmile:

mech
Yes, that is a good idea to seal the back.

Here are a few pictures I uploaded yesterday. Not the best pictures - I'm waiting for my new camera that I already have but can't open until Christmas, :crying: And when I learn how to use it, hopefully the pics will be better.





BTW, I did a trial calibration. I found that I didn't do much adjustment based on the Avia II DVD - mostly in the Red gain, and tint. Otherwise, my projector was pretty close without much adjustment.
 

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It's home-made! Trent is a man of many talents!

To be honest, those nylon bolts give me the shivers (bad past experiences), but I assume Trent knows what he is doing.
Tell me about your bad experiences? I've never used them before.

I had tried to thread aluminum rod, but never have had good results, and wanted to stay away from steel (heat)... The nylon bolts were readily available and met my need.
 

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Tell me about your bad experiences? I've never used them before.

I had tried to thread aluminum rod, but never have had good results, and wanted to stay away from steel (heat)... The nylon bolts were readily available and met my need.
BTW, I'm not using them as structural components. They are simply used as adjustment bolts/spacers to fine tune the tilt front to back and up and down on the y axis. The projector is mounted through the nylon bolts with black oxide alloy steel M3 x 30mm cap head screws.

 
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