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Good morning, Guys......I recently installed a PT- AE2000U with a Sony Blu Ray and an Elite screen. I also built a 96" screen using Melamine with velvet border, etc. It seemed the Elite was the better of the two, so I retired the Mel and have been watching the Elite for a couple weeks. Note that I am new to this stuff, and don't know what to expect in a screen; what is good, great, etc.
I have a lot of heat/light reflective paint left over from a job, and decided to paint the Mel screen with it. I was surprised to find out that the movies looked much better with the painted screen, so I took down the Elite.
I would really like to have someone to test a painted surface for me to see what the screen gain is. I would be happy to send a painted object for testing, etc.
Can anyone help with this?
Thanks,
jim
 

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Well I'm getting closer to checking gain all the time. You can send it to me. I'll need a larger than normal piece though, at least 8X8 inches, to check gain. If you can't get me a piece that large I can still check it for neutrality and what not! :T I'll pm you my address Jim.
 

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Good morning, Guys......I recently installed a PT- AE2000U with a Sony Blu Ray and an Elite screen. I also built a 96" screen using Melamine with velvet border, etc. It seemed the Elite was the better of the two, so I retired the Mel and have been watching the Elite for a couple weeks. Note that I am new to this stuff, and don't know what to expect in a screen; what is good, great, etc.
I have a lot of heat/light reflective paint left over from a job, and decided to paint the Mel screen with it. I was surprised to find out that the movies looked much better with the painted screen, so I took down the Elite.
I would really like to have someone to test a painted surface for me to see what the screen gain is. I would be happy to send a painted object for testing, etc.
Can anyone help with this?
Thanks,
jim
First things first... Welcome to the Shack!

Okay, you said you are new to all this. No problem. Let's try to get you up to speed! :)

I see many times a new person asks for help and immediately they are swamped with DIY developers giving recommendations, but usually they only give their screen options as a recommendation without actually assessing what the user wants or needs. Most often since the user is new, they really don't know one screen from the next so naturally the see an improvement and are wowed, but without ever seeing anything else or more importantly, without doing a baseline calibration on a white reference screen, they really won't know if something else may have been better suited for them.

In your case I see you've already used a sheet of white melamine, as well as an Elite Screen. What model of Elite screen did you use? Was it white or gray, and what did they list the gain as? And... did you do a calibration? Actually you need to recalibrate or at least check your calibration any time you change screens.

The PT-AE2000U mated with a Bluray player should be an incredible match!

What brand is the paint you used and is this a gray color or white and what was the Elite? If the Elite was just a 1.0 gain white screen and the paint is a light gray, I have no doubt that the image probably looks better if your painted screen is slightly darker in shade. Most likely better blacks and shadow detail if my guess is right.

Gain isn't as important as it is made out to be. It is more of a tool than an indication of ultimate performance. Too much gain and problems start to arise. Too little when some is needed, and the image tends to look dull and muddy. Basically gain is used to get you where you need to be at as far as recommended fL brightness. Too much gain and the viewing cone starts to become retricted, and also color shifting can occur outside of the sweet spot.

You're projector is bright and has very good CR. I always recommend that a person do a baseline calibration on a white reference screen. Why do I feel this is so important? Well the manufacturer does their Quality Control testing on a unity gain white reference screen and that's what the projector is setup for. By doing a baseline on a white reference screen you'll see the projector exactly how the company engineered it to work. From there and based on your setup, you may be able to do a few things to make the image even better.

Sounds like you have an interesting paint. We'd love to get some readings on it and see what the shade is as well as color balance. Do you have any pictures of your setup? It's always fun to see other people's layout. :)
 

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Hi, Bill....Nice of you to help out....First; I don't know what "baseline calibration" is I'll look through the written stuff from Panasonic today.
The model Elite screen is M84UWH, and is white in color, with a 1.1 gain. I was very happy with the screen until I painted the Melimine. The painted screen has a very rough surface, with no hot spots. I used a roller when I painted it, and was not happy to see edge lines from the roller, but these imperfections can not be seen while watching the movie.
I also am using a Sony 1080p upscale player for DVDs, and movies look super with this setup, also.
The paint was created as a heat reflective paint. A sheet of sheet metal laying in the sun won't raise more than 5 degrees than the ambient temp. A room with the walls painted, becomes really bright as the light is reflected. That's what got me thinking about painting the screen. Also, the guy who invented the paint, told me it contains kevlar, which makes it extremely durable as you can scrub other paint, like graffiti, off without damage.
 

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Hi, Bill....Nice of you to help out....First; I don't know what "baseline calibration" is I'll look through the written stuff from Panasonic today.

By baseline what I mean is getting an initial calibration on a white reference screen. This way a person can evaluate any new screen they try and know if it improved things or not. Without knowing what the projector looks like under ideal conditions that the factory uses, it's impossible to tell if a new screen is better or worse. Make sense? Also when you recalibrate to the new screen, as long as the new screen is D65 neutral and the white reference screen is D65, you'll find that very little recalibration is required. Mainly you'll find the colors will remain the same settings and you just need to calibrate the brightness and contrast.

The model Elite screen is M84UWH, and is white in color, with a 1.1 gain. I was very happy with the screen until I painted the Melimine. The painted screen has a very rough surface, with no hot spots. I used a roller when I painted it, and was not happy to see edge lines from the roller, but these imperfections can not be seen while watching the movie.

The rough surface is helping to diffuse the light. As long as it's not too rough it won't be a problem. If the paint is as reflective as you are saying, this roughness is probably what's keeping it from hot spotting.

It will be interesting not only to see what the gain of the screen you made is, but also what the shade and color balance is as well.

I also am using a Sony 1080p upscale player for DVDs, and movies look super with this setup, also.
The paint was created as a heat reflective paint. A sheet of sheet metal laying in the sun won't raise more than 5 degrees than the ambient temp. A room with the walls painted, becomes really bright as the light is reflected. That's what got me thinking about painting the screen. Also, the guy who invented the paint, told me it contains kevlar, which makes it extremely durable as you can scrub other paint, like graffiti, off without damage.
Why not use the Sony BD player to upconvert SDVDs as well? Just curious is all. I have both an HD DVD player and a Bluray player hooked to my HDTV and projector and I just let them handle SDVDs as well.

Kevlar screens! Cool!
 

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Hello. Bill....I really don't know if the DIY screen is more reflective or not; that's what I wanted to find out. I don't know why it looks better than the previous screens. This morning, I shipped off a board coated with this paint to mech, and he's going to take a look at it to see if the paint makes a good surface or not. All I know is that the wife and I thinks it looks a lot better. I played with the colors a little bit, but they are have been almost at default settings.
One more thing: I messed up with my projector model numbers. I have the PT-AX200U, and not the
200.
jim
 

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Same projector I have.

I'd say it looks better to you because a gray screen takes the edge off the really bright areas that can tend to look washed out on a white screen. At the same time blacks and percieved contrast also looks better, so the overall image looks better.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
No....my paint is bright white. I can send you a painted board, too if you want. Then you could give me your thoughts on it too.
 

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Jim,

Here's the data. In about a week or so I'll check gain on it.



242 243 237
0.3161 0.3352 88.97
95.57 -1.22 2.90
6282.4

This is a pretty typical white number wise. But what's interesting is that there's a gritty feel to it and there seems to be a touch of sheen.

Is there some sort of grit in the actual paint? Also, was this just a single coat you sent or was it more? I think I can see the hardboard leeching through.
 

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Hey, Mech....Yeah, that was only one coat painted with a brush. I painted my Mel screen with a roller, and only one coat. I was going to buy another sheet of mel, and do a better job of painting, but I have been so pleased with the screen, I haven't done anything.
This paint is gritty. I don't know exactly why; it might be from the kevlar. You can scrub the surface with a brillo pad with no damage to the paint.
I have some clothes that I got this paint on about five years ago, with many washings, and the paint on my pants still looks new. Really tough stuff.
I'll look foreward to the rest of your testing,
jim
 

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Well with it only being one coat, the numbers only mean so much. This stuff does look very intriguing though!

Here's a macro of the 'grit'.



And magnifications

60X



200X





What's this stuff called Jim? Is it water based?
 

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I see the spheres too and they even look like glass beads I have, granted the dispersion doesn't look to be that high of a percentage.
 

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Morning, Guys....The paint is called Enerchron V40. You can Google it and find loads of info on it. Really amazing stuff, and now I have found another use for it.
 
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