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Discussion Starter #42
Thanks Owen.

It really adds to the 1812 & "Toccata & Fuge"

I mainly listen to music and wasn't aware of what bass content was available in movies until I joined this forum.
It's been a great temporary addition while the new house is being built. The Shiva is eventually going to live in my current project which is a three way active crossover/tri-amped system in curved enclosures.
When that's finished I may have to consider a Mal X or two to replace it.
 

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Nilcely done capable sub :T I wanted to ask you as i am ok with electronics while not so good with carpentry could you tell me please how are those perfectly shaped curves and lines being done (i guess you use a pivot point for the holes) ? For the port brace can you actually see the marks you drawn through the bottom router plate?
 

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Discussion Starter #45
I keep coming back to this thread, I just love the construction of this water-tower you built! Fantastic workmanship, Robbo!
Thanks Raven,
(I only just saw your post today.)

I did it mainly to see what could be done if you think outside the square.

Nilcely done capable sub :T I wanted to ask you as i am ok with electronics while not so good with carpentry could you tell me please how are those perfectly shaped curves and lines being done (i guess you use a pivot point for the holes) ? For the port brace can you actually see the marks you drawn through the bottom router plate?
Yes, I used a pivot arm on the router (you could use a template as well with pre-set holes) and cut the outer circle first, It made it easier to maneuver the pieces. Then I cut the bracing semi-circles, then I cut the spokes using a jigsaw and finally I cut out the inner circle which braces the port.

The lines are visible in the router and you line it up and then plunge it into the wood, first cut is ~1/4" then 1/2" and then the last bit. Make sure you have some scrap board underneath for the last cut. :doh:
 

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Thanx, now it makes more sense to me, i only need to try it out. I got my router just yesterday but i am afraid. I know it is a silly to ask, is it of any concern you know losing a finger with it? (the tool is downwards all the time though)
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Thanx, now it makes more sense to me, i only need to try it out. I got my router just yesterday but i am afraid. I know it is a silly to ask, is it of any concern you know losing a finger with it? (the tool is downwards all the time though)
With the plunge router you need to hold both handles to control it properly, both up/down and side to side so your fingers shouldn't be anywhere near the bit. Take your time and don't force it. Set the depth stops, if it has them, to do multiple passes at different depths.

I clamped the circles to the bench and worked on the half opposite the clamp and then rotated it 180° and worked on the other half.
If you have a shop vac then connect it to the router and it will save a lot of mess and remember to wear hearing and eye protection.
Also when changing bits make sure it is switched off and unplugged so there is no chance of an accident.

In this picture you can see I have not cut through the whole sheet yet and this makes it easier to handle.

 

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I won't post it, but if you search, there is a story about a guy that let his router get away from him and it bit off most of his fingers at the first knuckle.

We are talking about a 1-3 HP machine with an open blade spinning so fast you wouldn't feel it till after it was through the bone.

Sorry to sound scary, but you should respect the machine and be in control of it 100% of the time. I've been a casual woodworker for about 15 years now, and I've seen too many accidents that were due to people being too comfortable with the tools, not knowing the tools, or rushing through projects with the tools.

With a router, *always* be in control of it, and learn which direction you can apply it to wood (remember it's a spinning blade and it wants to feed only one way!), and you need to learn patients... good setup and small cuts vs. deep gouges will make things smoother, easier, and safer.

EDIT: I take that back, 20 years I've been working with wood now! Wow!
 

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Hi guys;
I have a pair of first generation Shivas in a .96 cf cabnet. Driven by a Musical Concept modified Hafler 220 (185 w/p/ch) with dual power supplies and a low pass of 60 HZ they performed well. However I did the Musical Concepts mods on a Hafler 500 and did the dual power (340 w/p/ch) and same 60 HZ low pass, the Shivas liked it even better. (amp is run on a seperate 30 amp line from the house fuse box) Volume was not the issue but nice clean no boom detail. At some point the sound tends to get less audible but you can feel it in the floor. Shivas definately like wattege.
 
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