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Do you think this is a good idea if I solder all speaker wire ends? The straight copper is best I know, but sometimes strands come apart etc..
 

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IMO it's up to you. Some people find it makes handling the wire easier.
 

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One objection I've seen is that the solder gradually flows, so if it's separating the copper strands, it eventually results in an intermittant contact and the binding post contacts have to be tightened again after "a while".

FWIW, I use unsoldered stranded wire in banana plugs. It's easierer for me to clamp the wires in the plugs out in the middle of the room than to fight with the speaker binding posts down behind in the dark.
 

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Do you think this is a good idea if I solder all speaker wire ends? The straight copper is best I know, but sometimes strands come apart etc..
http://www.monoprice.com/products/p...=10401&cs_id=1040115&p_id=2801&seq=1&format=2

Don't make this hard. Pick up the above. Use them to hook up to a receiver. get 7 pairs.

For your speaker end wire. Don't even mess with soldering it. There is simply no need.

It doesn't matter if it's stranded or solid. As long as you have enough gauge(16) you are golden.
 

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With strands, you have to worry about a stray shorting to the adjacent connector, which is why some people like to solder them together. Crimp-on spade lugs can be effective at keeping the strands together, too.
 

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I don't like the crimp on lugs. They're bound to cause issues eventually. Unless you solder them after making the crimp. In which case it's difficult (without a standalone liquid flux) to get the solder to flow to where it's needed. I'm simply very careful about stray strands. Another option is to solder just the tips of the wire, to hold the strands together, while leaving the bare copper to conduct to the binding post.

One trick to avoiding stray strands is to twist the strands really tight. Best trick I've seen for this is when you go to strip the conductors, instead of stripping, use whatever you're using to strip to just cut the insulation, leaving the insulation in place temporarily. Before removing the insulation, use it to twist the strands.

You'll never get a tighter twist than that.
 

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http://www.monoprice.com/products/p...=10401&cs_id=1040115&p_id=2801&seq=1&format=2

Don't make this hard. Pick up the above. Use them to hook up to a receiver. get 7 pairs.

For your speaker end wire. Don't even mess with soldering it. There is simply no need.

It doesn't matter if it's stranded or solid. As long as you have enough gauge(16) you are golden.
I second the banana plugs. Best investment you'll make. Especially if you change things a lot. Makes hookups really quick.
 

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With strands, you have to worry about a stray shorting to the adjacent connector, which is why some people like to solder them together. Crimp-on spade lugs can be effective at keeping the strands together, too.
Nothing like a strand to trip the protection circuit.:huh:
 

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Nothing like a strand to trip the protection circuit.:huh:
...if you are lucky and do not toast an output device.:bigsmile: Service techs love big cables with lots of little strands...
 

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Alright, I understand the quest for oxidation reduction, however I am not tracking as far as the methods are concern. Can someone please explain?

If the drivers voice coils are soldered to the terminals, then why wouldn't you solder/tin speaker wire to:
  1. either go into the terminal
  2. go into a banana plug
  3. or to go in any other type of connector?
It's just not registering in my head being that microchips, memory, leads and various other electrical connections in components are soldered.

confused :scratch:
 

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Like I said before:

IMO it's up to you. Some people find it makes handling the wire easier.
There is nothing IMHO right nor wrong with soldering or not soldering.
 

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The only problem with soldering is that solder is soft and over time it flattens and you may have to retighten the connection.
 

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I have heard of at least one "fastidious" audiophile that has no socket/plug connections in his system. All IC's and cables are terminated in soldered connections. I believe that's too many steps in the "right direction". However, he has gas tight connections.
A gas tight connection is the best way to connect anything. It's required for most military and aerospace applications. There is a link below to a technical paper. It's not full of jargon and formulas. It's informative and an easy read.

http://www.picwire.com/technical/paper6.html

Myself, I use Kimber postmaster spades soldered with silver solder. The solder comes from the "Shack". It's a lot cheaper than "Hi-Fi" solder. Spades allow a tighter connection.
 

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If you think you have to use solder, either due to loose strands or ease of installation, only use a high quality silver solder. Never use the 60/40 tin solder for your audiio projects. Pure copper wire to your terminals always provides a better connection with less resistance. I would only use the solder when necessary.

As far as the speaker builders using solder to make their connections within the drivers, there is no getting around that and I feel sure they use a high quality solder, at least with the upper scale driver builders.

When I solder my drivers to my interconnect wiring, I feed the bare wire through the terminal hole provided for me and carry the wire around the terminal and solder the wire directly to the lead in wire of the driver. I also solder the wire at the hole in the terminal for both a more secure connection and it also acts as a strain releif so you don't rip the lead in wire from the driver.
 

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One vote for solder.
 

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Selden touched on this. Solder cold flows, so with time temperature changes and vibration will allow soldered wire in screw terminals to loosen. Also solder creates a hard spot along the wire, so in portable systems or anyplace that the wires vibrate, the wire could fracture at that hard spot.
 

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Also solder creates a hard spot along the wire, so in portable systems or anyplace that the wires vibrate, the wire could fracture at that hard spot.
I learned the technique of soldering to the terminal leads to the cone near the terminal connection from the engineers at Audience. There is very little movement there. I am a distributor for the company. Audience is home of the ClairAudient loudspeakers, Auricap capacitors, and the A3 drivers. They also manufacture a line of very high end audio products.

I haven't experienced any wire breakage as of yet, but when I do, I'll re-post.

I can see a possible scenerio of a wire breaking in a large section of wire; ie splice or line tap connection subject to a massive amount of movement, just as any other solid piece of metal would. That makes sense.
 

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When i did my connections to my crimp on bananas from PE i skipped the crimping part and filled the hole in the banana with solder and stuck the wire in let it harden and i haven't had any issues. Oh, and i used silver solder.
 
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