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hi all,

just need a little knowledge to make a sub. I am gonna build a sonotube and wants info on configuration. I see on this forum talk about dual sealed opposed drivers in sub and push pull drivers in sub. Can someone clarify the difference to these setups and provide pictures or links so I can see them. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

I have tried searching this but my tablet is not being nice to me in displaying results.

thanks

Pete
 

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The primary difference is in how they're wired. What benefit you're looking to achieve will dictate which alignment works better.

Push/pull is used to describe a subwoofer that has drivers wired out of phase, so while one is pushing outward to produce sound the other is pulling backward...



The benefit is cancelling/lessening of harmonic distortion. Think along the lines of the Kelvin scale used to determine the color of light. Red hues sit on one side of the spectrum while blue is on the opposite end. Combine a certain amount of red with a specific amount of blue and you'll get 'pure' white, which not coincidentally resides in between red and blue...



Dual opposed has both drivers wired in phase, so when one is pushing outward the other is as well. The advantage to this alignment is cancelling/lessening of cabinet resonance...



When a driver moves it transfers energy waves into the enclosure, which in turn creates sympathetic vibrations. No matter how inert the cabinet is there will be some coloration of the sound due to that phenomenon; the enclosure begins to make its own noises, so in essence it's another driver. Using the picture above, when the top driver is pushing outward it would begin to stress the enclosure upward, but at the same time the bottom driver is doing the exact opposite - stressing the enclosure downward - so in effect they cancel each other. This setup doesn't eliminate cabinet resonance, but it greatly reduces it such that it's all but inaudible (assuming the cabinet was properly constructed, of course).
 
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